What is the best strategy for retaining gestures in working memory?

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/620356
Title:
What is the best strategy for retaining gestures in working memory?
Authors:
Gimenes, Guillaume; Pennequin, Valérie; Mercer, Tom
Abstract:
This study aimed to determine whether the recall of gestures in working memory could be enhanced by verbal or gestural strategies. We also attempted to examine whether these strategies could help resist verbal or gestural interference. Fifty-four participants were divided into three groups according to the content of the training session. This included a control group, a verbal strategy group (where gestures were associated with labels) and a gestural strategy group (where participants repeated gestures and were told to imagine reproducing the movements). During the experiment, the participants had to reproduce a series of gestures under three conditions: "no interference", gestural interference (gestural suppression) and verbal interference (articulatory suppression). The results showed that task performance was enhanced in the verbal strategy group, but there was no significant difference between the gestural strategy and control groups. Moreover, compared to the "no interference" condition, performance decreased in the presence of gestural interference, except within the verbal strategy group. Finally, verbal interference hindered performance in all groups. The discussion focuses on the use of labels to recall gestures and differentiates the induced strategies from self-initiated strategies.
Citation:
What is the best strategy for retaining gestures in working memory? 2016, 24 (6):757-65 Memory
Publisher:
Taylor & Francis
Journal:
Memory (Hove, England), Volume 24, 2016 - Issue 6
Issue Date:
Aug-2015
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/620356
DOI:
10.1080/09658211.2015.1049544
PubMed ID:
26274349
Additional Links:
http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/09658211.2015.1049544?journalCode=pmem20
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
1464-0686
Appears in Collections:
FEHW

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorGimenes, Guillaumeen
dc.contributor.authorPennequin, Valérieen
dc.contributor.authorMercer, Tomen
dc.date.accessioned2017-01-26T15:23:15Z-
dc.date.available2017-01-26T15:23:15Z-
dc.date.issued2015-08-
dc.identifier.citationWhat is the best strategy for retaining gestures in working memory? 2016, 24 (6):757-65 Memoryen
dc.identifier.issn1464-0686-
dc.identifier.pmid26274349-
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/09658211.2015.1049544-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/620356-
dc.description.abstractThis study aimed to determine whether the recall of gestures in working memory could be enhanced by verbal or gestural strategies. We also attempted to examine whether these strategies could help resist verbal or gestural interference. Fifty-four participants were divided into three groups according to the content of the training session. This included a control group, a verbal strategy group (where gestures were associated with labels) and a gestural strategy group (where participants repeated gestures and were told to imagine reproducing the movements). During the experiment, the participants had to reproduce a series of gestures under three conditions: "no interference", gestural interference (gestural suppression) and verbal interference (articulatory suppression). The results showed that task performance was enhanced in the verbal strategy group, but there was no significant difference between the gestural strategy and control groups. Moreover, compared to the "no interference" condition, performance decreased in the presence of gestural interference, except within the verbal strategy group. Finally, verbal interference hindered performance in all groups. The discussion focuses on the use of labels to recall gestures and differentiates the induced strategies from self-initiated strategies.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherTaylor & Francisen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/09658211.2015.1049544?journalCode=pmem20en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Memory (Hove, England)en
dc.subjectworking memoryen
dc.subjectgesturesen
dc.subjectstrategyen
dc.titleWhat is the best strategy for retaining gestures in working memory?en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalMemory (Hove, England), Volume 24, 2016 - Issue 6en

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