Wakeful rest alleviates interference-based forgetting

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/620355
Title:
Wakeful rest alleviates interference-based forgetting
Authors:
Mercer, Tom
Abstract:
Retroactive interference (RI)—the disruptive influence of events occurring after the formation of a new memory—is one of the primary causes of forgetting. Placing individuals within an environment that postpones interference should, therefore, greatly reduce the likelihood of information being lost from memory. For example, a short period of wakeful rest should diminish interference-based forgetting. To test this hypothesis, participants took part in a foreign language learning activity and were shown English translations of 20 Icelandic words for immediate recall. Half of the participants were then given an 8-min rest before completing a similar or dissimilar interfering distractor task. The other half did not receive a rest until after the distractor task, at which point interference had already taken place. All participants were then asked to translate the Icelandic words for a second time. Results revealed that retention was significantly worse at the second recall test, but being allowed a brief rest before completing the distractor task helped reduce the amount of forgetting. Taking a short, passive break can shield new memories from RI and alleviate forgetting.
Citation:
Wakeful rest alleviates interference-based forgetting 2014, 23 (2):127 Memory
Publisher:
Taylor & Francis
Journal:
Memory, Volume 23, 2015 - Issue 2
Issue Date:
13-Jan-2014
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/620355
DOI:
10.1080/09658211.2013.872279
Additional Links:
http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/09658211.2013.872279
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
0965-8211; 1464-0686
Sponsors:
ERAS Scheme, University of Wolverhampton
Appears in Collections:
FEHW

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorMercer, Tomen
dc.date.accessioned2017-01-26T15:10:14Z-
dc.date.available2017-01-26T15:10:14Z-
dc.date.issued2014-01-13-
dc.identifier.citationWakeful rest alleviates interference-based forgetting 2014, 23 (2):127 Memoryen
dc.identifier.issn0965-8211-
dc.identifier.issn1464-0686-
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/09658211.2013.872279-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/620355-
dc.description.abstractRetroactive interference (RI)—the disruptive influence of events occurring after the formation of a new memory—is one of the primary causes of forgetting. Placing individuals within an environment that postpones interference should, therefore, greatly reduce the likelihood of information being lost from memory. For example, a short period of wakeful rest should diminish interference-based forgetting. To test this hypothesis, participants took part in a foreign language learning activity and were shown English translations of 20 Icelandic words for immediate recall. Half of the participants were then given an 8-min rest before completing a similar or dissimilar interfering distractor task. The other half did not receive a rest until after the distractor task, at which point interference had already taken place. All participants were then asked to translate the Icelandic words for a second time. Results revealed that retention was significantly worse at the second recall test, but being allowed a brief rest before completing the distractor task helped reduce the amount of forgetting. Taking a short, passive break can shield new memories from RI and alleviate forgetting.en
dc.description.sponsorshipERAS Scheme, University of Wolverhamptonen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherTaylor & Francisen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/09658211.2013.872279en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Memoryen
dc.subjectForgettingen
dc.subjectinterferenceen
dc.subjectmemoryen
dc.subjectresten
dc.titleWakeful rest alleviates interference-based forgettingen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalMemory, Volume 23, 2015 - Issue 2en
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