2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/620352
Title:
Romantic Palingenesis, or History from the Ashes
Authors:
Colbert, Benjamin
Abstract:
Palingenesis, or regeneration from decay, is variously invoked by eighteenth to early-nineteenth-century natural philosophy, psychology, mythography, and literature. Its currency derives from the Swiss-French scientist Charles Bonnet’s Palingénésie philosophique (1769), which conceives of natural history as repeated renewal after epochal catastrophes. Herder’s Über die seelenwanderung (1782) develops an idea of “natural palingenesis” as the internal “rebirth” of selfhood within memory despite physiological decay. Pierre-Simon Ballanche’s fragmentary magnum opus Essais de palingénésie sociale (1827-29) turned to political upheaval, locating the French Revolution within a process by which expiatory suffering gives birth to a new social order. Other writers looked back to alchemical experiments. Robert Southey reviewed these experiments in Omniana (1812) under the heading, “Spectral Flowers,” and still other writers explored the palingenetic properties of resurrected bodies and ghosts. In the light of this not altogether unified discourse, this paper will consider the more discontented, sceptical, at times satiric, strain within Shelley’s poetry, where beautiful idealisms of progressivist transformation do not entirely overcome the fact of death, decay, degeneration, and loss that is their substrata.
Publisher:
Taylor & Francis
Journal:
European Romantic Review
Issue Date:
Mar-2017
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/620352
Additional Links:
http://www.tandfonline.com/loi/gerr20?open=27&repitition=0#vol_27
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
1050-9585
Appears in Collections:
CTTR

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorColbert, Benjaminen
dc.date.accessioned2017-01-25T14:21:02Z-
dc.date.available2017-01-25T14:21:02Z-
dc.date.issued2017-03-
dc.identifier.issn1050-9585en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/620352-
dc.description.abstractPalingenesis, or regeneration from decay, is variously invoked by eighteenth to early-nineteenth-century natural philosophy, psychology, mythography, and literature. Its currency derives from the Swiss-French scientist Charles Bonnet’s Palingénésie philosophique (1769), which conceives of natural history as repeated renewal after epochal catastrophes. Herder’s Über die seelenwanderung (1782) develops an idea of “natural palingenesis” as the internal “rebirth” of selfhood within memory despite physiological decay. Pierre-Simon Ballanche’s fragmentary magnum opus Essais de palingénésie sociale (1827-29) turned to political upheaval, locating the French Revolution within a process by which expiatory suffering gives birth to a new social order. Other writers looked back to alchemical experiments. Robert Southey reviewed these experiments in Omniana (1812) under the heading, “Spectral Flowers,” and still other writers explored the palingenetic properties of resurrected bodies and ghosts. In the light of this not altogether unified discourse, this paper will consider the more discontented, sceptical, at times satiric, strain within Shelley’s poetry, where beautiful idealisms of progressivist transformation do not entirely overcome the fact of death, decay, degeneration, and loss that is their substrata.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherTaylor & Francisen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.tandfonline.com/loi/gerr20?open=27&repitition=0#vol_27en
dc.subjectRomanticismen
dc.subjectPalingenesisen
dc.subjectAlchemyen
dc.subjectPercy Bysshe Shelleyen
dc.subjectThomas Carlyleen
dc.titleRomantic Palingenesis, or History from the Ashesen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalEuropean Romantic Reviewen
dc.date.accepted2017-12-
rioxxterms.funderInternalen
rioxxterms.identifier.projectUoW250117BCen
rioxxterms.versionAMen
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttps://creativecommons.org/CC BY-NC-ND 4.0en
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2018-10-01en
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