The Experiences of Cognitive Behavioural Therapists when delivering Manualised Therapy to Black and Minority Ethnic Clients

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Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/620346
Title:
The Experiences of Cognitive Behavioural Therapists when delivering Manualised Therapy to Black and Minority Ethnic Clients
Authors:
Akhtar, Nazreen
Abstract:
Rationale: This study was conducted to help improve mental health care for Black and Minority Ethnic (BME) clients as previous research carried out in non-western countries has suggested that western-developed psychotherapies often need to be culturally adapted to become more effective in treating this client group. The aim of this study was to explore how CBT therapists deliver manualised CBT with BME clients and if they make any adaptations, how and to what extent are they implemented. Method: Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis (IPA) guided the conduct and analysis of one-to-one, semi-structured interviews with six CBT therapists working in an Improving Access to Psychological Therapies (IAPT) service. The inclusion criteria for participants was accreditation with the BABCP, completion of an IAPT programme CBT diploma and to be currently working in an IAPT service, at least two years experience as a CBT therapist and at least four cases of completed therapy with BME clients. Findings: Four master themes emerged (1) CBT is based on western principles, (2) The complex nature of CBT, (3) Changing practice of manualised CBT and (4) The influence of therapist factors. Conclusion: The participants experienced many issues in their practice of manualised CBT with BME clients which led them to make changes including adaptations to manualised CBT. They described their current practice as being integrative as they incorporated therapeutic approaches other than pure manualised CBT, making them more flexible and adaptable. The adaptations involved altering the cognitive and behavioural interventions to better suit the individual needs of the client. The adaptations took into account the client’s culture, religion, language, psychological mindedness, acculturation to their host country, education and age. The participants’ confidence in CBT and their self-identity as therapists also influenced their overall practice of therapy. Recommendations for practice are discussed in relation to therapeutic practice, training of therapists, supervision and policy makers.
Issue Date:
Oct-2016
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/620346
Type:
Thesis
Language:
en
Description:
A Portfolio Submitted to The University of Wolverhampton for the Practitioner Doctorate, Counselling Psychology Award: D.Couns.Psych
Appears in Collections:
E-Theses

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorAkhtar, Nazreenen
dc.date.accessioned2017-01-20T16:32:08Z-
dc.date.available2017-01-20T16:32:08Z-
dc.date.issued2016-10-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/620346-
dc.descriptionA Portfolio Submitted to The University of Wolverhampton for the Practitioner Doctorate, Counselling Psychology Award: D.Couns.Psychen
dc.description.abstractRationale: This study was conducted to help improve mental health care for Black and Minority Ethnic (BME) clients as previous research carried out in non-western countries has suggested that western-developed psychotherapies often need to be culturally adapted to become more effective in treating this client group. The aim of this study was to explore how CBT therapists deliver manualised CBT with BME clients and if they make any adaptations, how and to what extent are they implemented. Method: Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis (IPA) guided the conduct and analysis of one-to-one, semi-structured interviews with six CBT therapists working in an Improving Access to Psychological Therapies (IAPT) service. The inclusion criteria for participants was accreditation with the BABCP, completion of an IAPT programme CBT diploma and to be currently working in an IAPT service, at least two years experience as a CBT therapist and at least four cases of completed therapy with BME clients. Findings: Four master themes emerged (1) CBT is based on western principles, (2) The complex nature of CBT, (3) Changing practice of manualised CBT and (4) The influence of therapist factors. Conclusion: The participants experienced many issues in their practice of manualised CBT with BME clients which led them to make changes including adaptations to manualised CBT. They described their current practice as being integrative as they incorporated therapeutic approaches other than pure manualised CBT, making them more flexible and adaptable. The adaptations involved altering the cognitive and behavioural interventions to better suit the individual needs of the client. The adaptations took into account the client’s culture, religion, language, psychological mindedness, acculturation to their host country, education and age. The participants’ confidence in CBT and their self-identity as therapists also influenced their overall practice of therapy. Recommendations for practice are discussed in relation to therapeutic practice, training of therapists, supervision and policy makers.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectblack and minority ethnicen
dc.subjectBMEen
dc.subjectethnic minorityen
dc.subjectcognitive behavioural therapyen
dc.subjectCBTen
dc.subjectimproving access to psychological therapiesen
dc.subjectadaptationsen
dc.subjectculturally sensitive CBTen
dc.subjectcultureen
dc.subjectmanualised treatmenten
dc.titleThe Experiences of Cognitive Behavioural Therapists when delivering Manualised Therapy to Black and Minority Ethnic Clientsen
dc.typeThesisen
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