Understanding the geographical development of social movements: a web-link analysis of Slow Food

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/620331
Title:
Understanding the geographical development of social movements: a web-link analysis of Slow Food
Authors:
HENDRIKX, BAS; DORMANS, STEFAN; LAGENDIJK, ARNOUD; Thelwall, Mike ( 0000-0001-6065-205X )
Abstract:
Slow Food (SF) is a global, grassroots movement aimed at enhancing and sustaining local food cultures and traditions worldwide. Since its establishment in the 1980s, Slow Food groups have emerged across the world and embedded in a wide range of different contexts. In this article, we explain how the movement, as a diverse whole, is being shaped by complex dynamics existing between grassroots flexibilities and emerging drives for movement coherence and harmonization. Unlike conventional studies on social movements, our approach helps one to understand transnational social movements as being simultaneously coherent and diverse bodies of collective action. Drawing on work in the fields of relational geography, assemblage theory and webometric research, we develop an analytical strategy that navigates and maps the entire Slow Food movement by exploring its ‘double articulation’ between the material-connective and ideational-expressive. Focusing on representations of this connectivity and articulation on the internet, we combine methodologies of computation research (webometrics) with more qualitative forms of (web) discourse analysis to achieve this. Our results point to the significance of particular networks and nodal points that support such double movements, each presenting core logistical channels of the movement's operations as well as points of relay of new ideas and practices. A network-based analysis of ‘double articulation’ thus shows how the co-evolution of ideas and material practices cascades into major trends without having to rely on a ‘grand', singular explanation of a movement's development.
Citation:
Understanding the geographical development of social movements: a web-link analysis of Slow Food 2017, 17 (1):47 Global Networks
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell
Journal:
Global Networks
Issue Date:
Nov-2016
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/620331
DOI:
10.1111/glob.12153
Additional Links:
http://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/glob.12153
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
1470-2266
Appears in Collections:
Statistical Cybermetrics Research Group

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorHENDRIKX, BASen
dc.contributor.authorDORMANS, STEFANen
dc.contributor.authorLAGENDIJK, ARNOUDen
dc.contributor.authorThelwall, Mikeen
dc.date.accessioned2017-01-09T10:03:56Z-
dc.date.available2017-01-09T10:03:56Z-
dc.date.issued2016-11-
dc.identifier.citationUnderstanding the geographical development of social movements: a web-link analysis of Slow Food 2017, 17 (1):47 Global Networksen
dc.identifier.issn1470-2266en
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/glob.12153-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/620331-
dc.description.abstractSlow Food (SF) is a global, grassroots movement aimed at enhancing and sustaining local food cultures and traditions worldwide. Since its establishment in the 1980s, Slow Food groups have emerged across the world and embedded in a wide range of different contexts. In this article, we explain how the movement, as a diverse whole, is being shaped by complex dynamics existing between grassroots flexibilities and emerging drives for movement coherence and harmonization. Unlike conventional studies on social movements, our approach helps one to understand transnational social movements as being simultaneously coherent and diverse bodies of collective action. Drawing on work in the fields of relational geography, assemblage theory and webometric research, we develop an analytical strategy that navigates and maps the entire Slow Food movement by exploring its ‘double articulation’ between the material-connective and ideational-expressive. Focusing on representations of this connectivity and articulation on the internet, we combine methodologies of computation research (webometrics) with more qualitative forms of (web) discourse analysis to achieve this. Our results point to the significance of particular networks and nodal points that support such double movements, each presenting core logistical channels of the movement's operations as well as points of relay of new ideas and practices. A network-based analysis of ‘double articulation’ thus shows how the co-evolution of ideas and material practices cascades into major trends without having to rely on a ‘grand', singular explanation of a movement's development.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwellen
dc.relation.urlhttp://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/glob.12153en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Global Networksen
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjecthyperlink analysisen
dc.subjectwebometricsen
dc.titleUnderstanding the geographical development of social movements: a web-link analysis of Slow Fooden
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalGlobal Networksen
dc.contributor.institutionGeography, Planning and Environment; Radboud University Nijmegen; Netherlands-
dc.contributor.institutionInstitute for Management Research; Radboud University Nijmegen-
dc.contributor.institutionGeography, Planning and Environment; Radboud University Nijmegen-
dc.contributor.institutionStatistical Cybermetrics Research Group; University of Wolverhampton-
dc.date.accepted2016-09-
rioxxterms.funderInternalen
rioxxterms.identifier.projectUoW090117MTen
rioxxterms.versionAMen
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttps://creativecommons.org/CC BY-NC-ND 4.0en
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2018-11-01en
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