5.00
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/620330
Title:
Do journal data sharing mandates work? Life sciences evidence from Dryad
Authors:
Thelwall, Mike ( 0000-0001-6065-205X ) ; Kousha, Kayvan ( 0000-0003-4827-971X )
Abstract:
Purpose: Data sharing is widely thought to help research quality and efficiency. Since data sharing mandates are increasingly adopted by journals this paper assesses whether they work. Design/methodology: This study examines two evolutionary biology journals, Evolution and Heredity, that have data sharing mandates and make extensive use of Dryad. It uses a quantitative analysis of presence in Dryad, downloads and citations. Findings: Within both journals, data sharing seems to be complete showing that the mandates work on a technical level. Low correlations (0.15-0.18) between data downloads and article citation counts for articles published in 2012 within these journals indicate a weak relationship between data sharing and research impact. An average of 40-55 data downloads per article after a few years suggests that some use is found for shared life sciences data. Research limitations: The value of shared data uses is unclear. Practical implications: Data sharing mandates should be encouraged as an effective strategy. Originality/value: This is the first analysis of the effectiveness of data sharing mandates.
Publisher:
Emerald
Journal:
Aslib Journal of Information Management
Issue Date:
Jan-2017
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/620330
Additional Links:
http://www.emeraldinsight.com/journal/ajim
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
2050-3806
Appears in Collections:
Statistical Cybermetrics Research Group

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorThelwall, Mikeen
dc.contributor.authorKousha, Kayvanen
dc.date.accessioned2017-01-05T15:08:36Z-
dc.date.available2017-01-05T15:08:36Z-
dc.date.issued2017-01-
dc.identifier.issn2050-3806en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/620330-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: Data sharing is widely thought to help research quality and efficiency. Since data sharing mandates are increasingly adopted by journals this paper assesses whether they work. Design/methodology: This study examines two evolutionary biology journals, Evolution and Heredity, that have data sharing mandates and make extensive use of Dryad. It uses a quantitative analysis of presence in Dryad, downloads and citations. Findings: Within both journals, data sharing seems to be complete showing that the mandates work on a technical level. Low correlations (0.15-0.18) between data downloads and article citation counts for articles published in 2012 within these journals indicate a weak relationship between data sharing and research impact. An average of 40-55 data downloads per article after a few years suggests that some use is found for shared life sciences data. Research limitations: The value of shared data uses is unclear. Practical implications: Data sharing mandates should be encouraged as an effective strategy. Originality/value: This is the first analysis of the effectiveness of data sharing mandates.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherEmeralden
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.emeraldinsight.com/journal/ajimen
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjectData sharingen
dc.subjectData citationen
dc.subjectCitation analysisen
dc.titleDo journal data sharing mandates work? Life sciences evidence from Dryaden
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalAslib Journal of Information Managementen
dc.date.accepted2016-12-
rioxxterms.funderInternalen
rioxxterms.identifier.projectUoW050117MTen
rioxxterms.versionAMen
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttps://creativecommons.org/CC BY-NC-ND 4.0en
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2017-01-31en
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