2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/620329
Title:
Flexibility, Labour Retention and Productivity in the EU
Authors:
Wang, Wen; Heyes, Jason
Abstract:
This paper examines the relationship between internal flexibility, the employment of fixed-term contract workers and productivity in 27 European Union countries. Drawing on European Company Survey data, the paper assesses whether establishments that employ on a fixed-term basis experience higher productivity than their competitors and stronger labour productivity improvements over time. These issues are of importance, given the recent weakness of productivity growth in many EU member countries, the steps that governments have taken to relax rules relating to the employment of fixed-term workers, and the emphasis placed on contractual flexibility within the European Commission's flexicurity agenda. The paper finds that establishments that do not use fixed-term contracts enjoy productivity advantages over those that do. Establishments that employ on a fixed-term basis but retain workers once their fixed-term contract has expired perform better than those that do not retain workers. The findings also show that establishments that pursue internal flexibility report both higher productivity than competitors and productivity increases over time. In addition, they are more likely to retain workers who have reached the end of a fixed-term contract.
Publisher:
Taylor & Francis
Journal:
International Journal of Human Resource Management
Issue Date:
Feb-2017
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/620329
Additional Links:
http://www.tandfonline.com/toc/rijh20/current
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
0958-5192
Appears in Collections:
Centre for International Development and Training (CIDT)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorWang, Wenen
dc.contributor.authorHeyes, Jasonen
dc.date.accessioned2017-01-05T14:50:07Z-
dc.date.available2017-01-05T14:50:07Z-
dc.date.issued2017-02-
dc.identifier.issn0958-5192en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/620329-
dc.description.abstractThis paper examines the relationship between internal flexibility, the employment of fixed-term contract workers and productivity in 27 European Union countries. Drawing on European Company Survey data, the paper assesses whether establishments that employ on a fixed-term basis experience higher productivity than their competitors and stronger labour productivity improvements over time. These issues are of importance, given the recent weakness of productivity growth in many EU member countries, the steps that governments have taken to relax rules relating to the employment of fixed-term workers, and the emphasis placed on contractual flexibility within the European Commission's flexicurity agenda. The paper finds that establishments that do not use fixed-term contracts enjoy productivity advantages over those that do. Establishments that employ on a fixed-term basis but retain workers once their fixed-term contract has expired perform better than those that do not retain workers. The findings also show that establishments that pursue internal flexibility report both higher productivity than competitors and productivity increases over time. In addition, they are more likely to retain workers who have reached the end of a fixed-term contract.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherTaylor & Francisen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.tandfonline.com/toc/rijh20/currenten
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjectEuropean Unionen
dc.subjectfixed-term employmenten
dc.subjectflexibilityen
dc.subjectlabour utilisationen
dc.subjectperformanceen
dc.subjectproductivityen
dc.titleFlexibility, Labour Retention and Productivity in the EUen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalInternational Journal of Human Resource Managementen
dc.date.accepted2016-12-
rioxxterms.funderInternalen
rioxxterms.identifier.projectUoW050117WWen
rioxxterms.versionAMen
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttps://creativecommons.org/CC BY-NC-ND 4.0en
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2018-08-31en
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