3.00
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/620310
Title:
Does Mendeley provide evidence of the educational value of journal articles?
Authors:
Thelwall, Mike ( 0000-0001-6065-205X )
Abstract:
Research articles seem to have direct value for students in some subject areas, even though scholars may be their target audience. If this can be proven to be true, then subject areas with this type of educational impact could justify claims for enhanced funding. To seek evidence of disciplinary differences in the direct educational uptake of journal articles, but ignoring books, conference papers, and other scholarly outputs, this paper assesses the total number and proportions of student readers of academic articles in Mendeley across 12 different subjects. The results suggest that whilst few students read mathematics research articles, in other areas, the number of student readers is broadly proportional to the number of research readers. Although the differences in the average numbers of undergraduate readers of articles varies by up to 50 times between subjects, this could be explained by the differing levels of uptake of Mendeley rather than the differing educational value of disciplinary research. Overall, then, the results do not support the claim that journal articles in some areas have substantially more educational value than average for academia, compared with their research value.
Citation:
Does Mendeley provide evidence of the educational value of journal articles? 2016 Learned Publishing
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell
Journal:
Learned Publishing
Issue Date:
Dec-2016
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/620310
DOI:
10.1002/leap.1076
Additional Links:
http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/leap.1076
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
0953-1513
Appears in Collections:
Statistical Cybermetrics Research Group

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorThelwall, Mikeen
dc.date.accessioned2016-12-16T12:19:07Z-
dc.date.available2016-12-16T12:19:07Z-
dc.date.issued2016-12-
dc.identifier.citationDoes Mendeley provide evidence of the educational value of journal articles? 2016 Learned Publishingen
dc.identifier.issn0953-1513en
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/leap.1076-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/620310-
dc.description.abstractResearch articles seem to have direct value for students in some subject areas, even though scholars may be their target audience. If this can be proven to be true, then subject areas with this type of educational impact could justify claims for enhanced funding. To seek evidence of disciplinary differences in the direct educational uptake of journal articles, but ignoring books, conference papers, and other scholarly outputs, this paper assesses the total number and proportions of student readers of academic articles in Mendeley across 12 different subjects. The results suggest that whilst few students read mathematics research articles, in other areas, the number of student readers is broadly proportional to the number of research readers. Although the differences in the average numbers of undergraduate readers of articles varies by up to 50 times between subjects, this could be explained by the differing levels of uptake of Mendeley rather than the differing educational value of disciplinary research. Overall, then, the results do not support the claim that journal articles in some areas have substantially more educational value than average for academia, compared with their research value.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwellen
dc.relation.urlhttp://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/leap.1076en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Learned Publishingen
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjectMendeleyen
dc.subjectaltmetricsen
dc.subjectwebometricsen
dc.titleDoes Mendeley provide evidence of the educational value of journal articles?en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalLearned Publishingen
dc.contributor.institutionStatistical Cybermetrics Research Group; University of Wolverhampton; UK-
dc.date.accepted2016-10-
rioxxterms.funderInternalen
rioxxterms.identifier.projectUoW161216MTen
rioxxterms.versionAMen
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttps://creativecommons.org/CC BY-NC-ND 4.0en
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2018-12-06en
This item is licensed under a Creative Commons License
Creative Commons
All Items in WIRE are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.