Self-Concept Clarity and Online Self-Presentation in Adolescents

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/620297
Title:
Self-Concept Clarity and Online Self-Presentation in Adolescents
Authors:
James, Billie May; Chen-Wilson, Chao-Hwa (Josephine); Fullwood, Chris ( 0000-0002-7714-6783 )
Abstract:
The Internet may be conceptualized as a social laboratory, providing freedom to experiment with different presentations of self. Adolescence is an important time in the development of self-concept; however, little is known about how clarity of self-concept relates to online behavior. The principal aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that self-concept clarity would be associated with adolescents’ inclination to experiment with online self-presentation. One hundred forty-eight participants aged 13–18 completed the Self-Concept Clarity Scale, the Facebook Intensity Scale, and the Presentation of Online Self Scale (POSS). Adolescents possessing a less stable sense of self-reported experimenting with online self-presentation more regularly, present an idealized version of self and a preference for presenting themselves online. Adolescents with a more stable self-concept reported presenting an online self, which was more consistent with their offline self-presentation. Younger adolescents were more likely to present an inconsistent self, whereas older adolescents presented themselves more consistently across different communication contexts. Finally, adolescents who spent more time on Facebook and had fewer Facebook friends were more likely to present multiple versions of self while online. The implications of these findings will be discussed in terms of the development of self-concept during adolescence and the potential for the online world to facilitate flexible identity construction and self-presentation.
Citation:
Self-Concept Clarity and Online Self-Presentation in Adolescents 2016 Cyberpsychology, Behavior, and Social Networking
Publisher:
Mary Ann Liebert
Journal:
Cyberpsychology, Behavior, and Social Networking
Issue Date:
10-Nov-2016
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/620297
DOI:
10.1089/cyber.2015.0623
Additional Links:
http://online.liebertpub.com/doi/10.1089/cyber.2015.0623
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
2152-2715
Appears in Collections:
FEHW

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorJames, Billie Mayen
dc.contributor.authorChen-Wilson, Chao-Hwa (Josephine)en
dc.contributor.authorFullwood, Chrisen
dc.date.accessioned2016-11-29T15:07:12Z-
dc.date.available2016-11-29T15:07:12Z-
dc.date.issued2016-11-10-
dc.identifier.citationSelf-Concept Clarity and Online Self-Presentation in Adolescents 2016 Cyberpsychology, Behavior, and Social Networkingen
dc.identifier.issn2152-2715en
dc.identifier.doi10.1089/cyber.2015.0623-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/620297-
dc.description.abstractThe Internet may be conceptualized as a social laboratory, providing freedom to experiment with different presentations of self. Adolescence is an important time in the development of self-concept; however, little is known about how clarity of self-concept relates to online behavior. The principal aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that self-concept clarity would be associated with adolescents’ inclination to experiment with online self-presentation. One hundred forty-eight participants aged 13–18 completed the Self-Concept Clarity Scale, the Facebook Intensity Scale, and the Presentation of Online Self Scale (POSS). Adolescents possessing a less stable sense of self-reported experimenting with online self-presentation more regularly, present an idealized version of self and a preference for presenting themselves online. Adolescents with a more stable self-concept reported presenting an online self, which was more consistent with their offline self-presentation. Younger adolescents were more likely to present an inconsistent self, whereas older adolescents presented themselves more consistently across different communication contexts. Finally, adolescents who spent more time on Facebook and had fewer Facebook friends were more likely to present multiple versions of self while online. The implications of these findings will be discussed in terms of the development of self-concept during adolescence and the potential for the online world to facilitate flexible identity construction and self-presentation.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherMary Ann Lieberten
dc.relation.urlhttp://online.liebertpub.com/doi/10.1089/cyber.2015.0623en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Cyberpsychology, Behavior, and Social Networkingen
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjectself-concept clarityen
dc.subjectFacebooken
dc.subjectself-presentationen
dc.titleSelf-Concept Clarity and Online Self-Presentation in Adolescentsen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalCyberpsychology, Behavior, and Social Networkingen
dc.date.accepted2016-11-
rioxxterms.funderInternalen
rioxxterms.identifier.projectUoW291116CFen
rioxxterms.versionAMen
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttps://creativecommons.org/CC BY-NC-ND 4.0en
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2017-11-09en
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