Perceptions of the risks and benefits of Internet access and use by people with intellectual disabilities

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/620294
Title:
Perceptions of the risks and benefits of Internet access and use by people with intellectual disabilities
Authors:
Chadwick, Darren D.; Quinn, Sally; Fullwood, Chris
Abstract:
Accessible summary Both good and bad things can happen when people use the Internet, and people with learning disabilities are not using the Internet as much as other people. Worry about the bad things that can happen online might be one reason people with learning disabilities are not supported to access the Internet as much as other people. We wanted to find out what people without learning disabilities believe about these good and bad things for people with learning disabilities. We wanted to find this out because the way people without disabilities think about the good and bad things online might affect how people with learning disabilities are treated. We found out that people without learning disabilities think that both the good and bad things are more likely to happen to people with learning disabilities when they use the Internet. Abstract Background: Information and communication technologies, with the Internet at the forefront, have the potential to enhance the knowledge, service, employment, development and social interactional opportunities available to people with intellectual disabilities. Despite this, people with intellectual disabilities are not accessing the Internet to the same degree as people without intellectual disabilities. Issues of safety, risk and protection online for people with intellectual disabilities have yet to be adequately investigated, and these currently serve as reasons given for hindering people from gaining online access. Materials and Method: This survey aimed to gauge the views people without intellectual disabilities have of risks and benefits of using the Internet for themselves and for people with intellectual disabilities and to compare self-ratings of risk and benefits to ratings for people with intellectual disabilities. Results: The survey findings indicate that, with only a small number of exceptions, both the risks and benefits of being online were believed to be greater for people with intellectual disabilities compared with those without intellectual disabilities. Greater use of the Internet was associated with increased perception of benefits to being online for both people with intellectual disabilities and for participants. Conclusions: Perceptions of increased benefits suggest more needs to be performed to improve online access whilst a perception of increased risk may help to explain the reduced inclusion of people with intellectual disabilities in the online world.
Citation:
Perceptions of the risks and benefits of Internet access and use by people with intellectual disabilities 2016 British Journal of Learning Disabilities
Publisher:
Wiley
Journal:
British Journal of Learning Disabilities
Issue Date:
Jul-2016
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/620294
DOI:
10.1111/bld.12170
Additional Links:
http://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/bld.12170; http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/bld.2016.44.issue-2/issuetoc
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
1354-4187
Appears in Collections:
FEHW

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorChadwick, Darren D.en
dc.contributor.authorQuinn, Sallyen
dc.contributor.authorFullwood, Chrisen
dc.date.accessioned2016-11-25T15:47:34Z-
dc.date.available2016-11-25T15:47:34Z-
dc.date.issued2016-07-
dc.identifier.citationPerceptions of the risks and benefits of Internet access and use by people with intellectual disabilities 2016 British Journal of Learning Disabilitiesen
dc.identifier.issn1354-4187en
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/bld.12170-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/620294-
dc.description.abstractAccessible summary Both good and bad things can happen when people use the Internet, and people with learning disabilities are not using the Internet as much as other people. Worry about the bad things that can happen online might be one reason people with learning disabilities are not supported to access the Internet as much as other people. We wanted to find out what people without learning disabilities believe about these good and bad things for people with learning disabilities. We wanted to find this out because the way people without disabilities think about the good and bad things online might affect how people with learning disabilities are treated. We found out that people without learning disabilities think that both the good and bad things are more likely to happen to people with learning disabilities when they use the Internet. Abstract Background: Information and communication technologies, with the Internet at the forefront, have the potential to enhance the knowledge, service, employment, development and social interactional opportunities available to people with intellectual disabilities. Despite this, people with intellectual disabilities are not accessing the Internet to the same degree as people without intellectual disabilities. Issues of safety, risk and protection online for people with intellectual disabilities have yet to be adequately investigated, and these currently serve as reasons given for hindering people from gaining online access. Materials and Method: This survey aimed to gauge the views people without intellectual disabilities have of risks and benefits of using the Internet for themselves and for people with intellectual disabilities and to compare self-ratings of risk and benefits to ratings for people with intellectual disabilities. Results: The survey findings indicate that, with only a small number of exceptions, both the risks and benefits of being online were believed to be greater for people with intellectual disabilities compared with those without intellectual disabilities. Greater use of the Internet was associated with increased perception of benefits to being online for both people with intellectual disabilities and for participants. Conclusions: Perceptions of increased benefits suggest more needs to be performed to improve online access whilst a perception of increased risk may help to explain the reduced inclusion of people with intellectual disabilities in the online world.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherWileyen
dc.relation.urlhttp://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/bld.12170en
dc.relation.urlhttp://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/bld.2016.44.issue-2/issuetocen
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to British Journal of Learning Disabilitiesen
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjectIntellectual disabilityen
dc.subjectpractical risksen
dc.subjectsocial interactionen
dc.titlePerceptions of the risks and benefits of Internet access and use by people with intellectual disabilitiesen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalBritish Journal of Learning Disabilitiesen
dc.contributor.institutionFaculty of Education, Health & Wellbeing; University of Wolverhampton; Mary Seacole Building, City Campus - North WV1 1AD, Wolverhampton UK-
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of York; York UK-
dc.contributor.institutionFaculty of Education, Health & Wellbeing; University of Wolverhampton; MC Block, City Campus WV1 1AD, Wolverhampton UK-
dc.date.accepted2016-05-
rioxxterms.funderInternalen
rioxxterms.identifier.projectUoW251116DCen
rioxxterms.versionAMen
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttps://creativecommons.org/CC BY-NC-ND 4.0en
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2018-07-14en
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