The loss of short-term visual representations over time: decay or temporal distinctiveness?

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/620291
Title:
The loss of short-term visual representations over time: decay or temporal distinctiveness?
Authors:
Mercer, Tom
Abstract:
There has been much recent interest in the loss of visual short-term memories over the passage of time. According to decay theory, visual representations are gradually forgotten as time passes, reflecting a slow and steady distortion of the memory trace. However, this is controversial and decay effects can be explained in other ways. The present experiment aimed to reexamine the maintenance and loss of visual information over the short term. Decay and temporal distinctiveness models were tested using a delayed discrimination task, in which participants compared complex and novel objects over unfilled retention intervals of variable length. Experiment 1 found no significant change in the accuracy of visual memory from 2 to 6 s, but the gap separating trials reliably influenced task performance. Experiment 2 found evidence for information loss at a 10-s retention interval, but temporally separating trials restored the fidelity of visual memory, possibly because temporally isolated representations are distinct from older memory traces. In conclusion, visual representations lose accuracy at some point after 6 s, but only within temporally crowded contexts. These findings highlight the importance of temporal distinctiveness within visual short-term memory.
Citation:
The loss of short-term visual representations over time: decay or temporal distinctiveness? 2014, 40 (6):2281-8 J Exp Psychol Hum Percept Perform
Publisher:
American Psychological Association
Journal:
Journal of experimental psychology. Human perception and performance
Issue Date:
Dec-2014
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/620291
DOI:
10.1037/a0038141
PubMed ID:
25314045
Additional Links:
http://wk6kg9sd8m.search.serialssolutions.com/?sid=sersol&SS_jc=JOURNOFEXPPS&title=Journal%20of%20experimental%20psychology.%20Human%20perception%20and%20performance
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Description:
Mercer, T. (2014). The loss of short-term visual representations over time: Decay or temporal distinctiveness? Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance, 40, 2281-2288. doi:10.1037/a0038141
ISSN:
1939-1277
Appears in Collections:
FEHW

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorMercer, Tomen
dc.date.accessioned2016-11-21T15:30:34Z-
dc.date.available2016-11-21T15:30:34Z-
dc.date.issued2014-12-
dc.identifier.citationThe loss of short-term visual representations over time: decay or temporal distinctiveness? 2014, 40 (6):2281-8 J Exp Psychol Hum Percept Performen
dc.identifier.issn1939-1277-
dc.identifier.pmid25314045-
dc.identifier.doi10.1037/a0038141-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/620291-
dc.descriptionMercer, T. (2014). The loss of short-term visual representations over time: Decay or temporal distinctiveness? Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance, 40, 2281-2288. doi:10.1037/a0038141en
dc.description.abstractThere has been much recent interest in the loss of visual short-term memories over the passage of time. According to decay theory, visual representations are gradually forgotten as time passes, reflecting a slow and steady distortion of the memory trace. However, this is controversial and decay effects can be explained in other ways. The present experiment aimed to reexamine the maintenance and loss of visual information over the short term. Decay and temporal distinctiveness models were tested using a delayed discrimination task, in which participants compared complex and novel objects over unfilled retention intervals of variable length. Experiment 1 found no significant change in the accuracy of visual memory from 2 to 6 s, but the gap separating trials reliably influenced task performance. Experiment 2 found evidence for information loss at a 10-s retention interval, but temporally separating trials restored the fidelity of visual memory, possibly because temporally isolated representations are distinct from older memory traces. In conclusion, visual representations lose accuracy at some point after 6 s, but only within temporally crowded contexts. These findings highlight the importance of temporal distinctiveness within visual short-term memory.en
dc.languageENG-
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherAmerican Psychological Associationen
dc.relation.urlhttp://wk6kg9sd8m.search.serialssolutions.com/?sid=sersol&SS_jc=JOURNOFEXPPS&title=Journal%20of%20experimental%20psychology.%20Human%20perception%20and%20performanceen
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Journal of experimental psychology. Human perception and performanceen
dc.subjectVisual memoryen
dc.subjectdecayen
dc.subjecttemporal distinctivenessen
dc.subjectforgettingen
dc.subjectshort-term memoryen
dc.subject.meshAdult-
dc.subject.meshAssociation Learning-
dc.subject.meshColor Perception-
dc.subject.meshDepth Perception-
dc.subject.meshDiscrimination Learning-
dc.subject.meshFemale-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshMale-
dc.subject.meshMemory, Short-Term-
dc.subject.meshOrientation-
dc.subject.meshPattern Recognition, Visual-
dc.subject.meshReaction Time-
dc.subject.meshRetention (Psychology)-
dc.subject.meshYoung Adult-
dc.titleThe loss of short-term visual representations over time: decay or temporal distinctiveness?en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalJournal of experimental psychology. Human perception and performanceen

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