Kevin and Peter: responses to two ‘preventable deaths’

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/620287
Title:
Kevin and Peter: responses to two ‘preventable deaths’
Authors:
Simpson, Graeme; Nowacki, Katja
Abstract:
European welfare states have substantial provision to ensure that children are brought up in conditions, which meet the articles of the United Nations’ Convention of the Rights of the Child. In our analysis of two preventable deaths in Germany and England, we focus primarily on Article 18, which directs states to ensure that there is adequate provision to support parents in their responsibilities, and Article 19, which ensures children’s safety and protection. We outline the legal framework, which existed at the time of two child deaths: ‘Kevin from Bremen’ and Peter in London, both young children who were subject to formal state supervision and oversight. The events – including the press response, their aftermath and the subsequent changes to social work practice through legislation and guidance will be examined. Our subsequent analysis will evaluate the extent to which events altered the balance between Articles 18 and 19 in the two countries, and the extent to which a Children’s Rights approach in this area offers new insights. The analysis will suggest that a rights-based approach offers some benefits for a comparative framework and understanding child and family social work, but also that it is not without some difficulties.
Publisher:
Routledge
Journal:
European Journal of Social Work
Issue Date:
16-May-2017
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/620287
DOI:
10.1080/13691457.2017.1320522
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Description:
German language abstract also attached
ISSN:
1369-1457
Appears in Collections:
FEHW

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorSimpson, Graemeen
dc.contributor.authorNowacki, Katjaen
dc.date.accessioned2016-11-18T10:08:40Z-
dc.date.available2016-11-18T10:08:40Z-
dc.date.issued2017-05-16-
dc.identifier.issn1369-1457en
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/13691457.2017.1320522-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/620287-
dc.descriptionGerman language abstract also attacheden
dc.description.abstractEuropean welfare states have substantial provision to ensure that children are brought up in conditions, which meet the articles of the United Nations’ Convention of the Rights of the Child. In our analysis of two preventable deaths in Germany and England, we focus primarily on Article 18, which directs states to ensure that there is adequate provision to support parents in their responsibilities, and Article 19, which ensures children’s safety and protection. We outline the legal framework, which existed at the time of two child deaths: ‘Kevin from Bremen’ and Peter in London, both young children who were subject to formal state supervision and oversight. The events – including the press response, their aftermath and the subsequent changes to social work practice through legislation and guidance will be examined. Our subsequent analysis will evaluate the extent to which events altered the balance between Articles 18 and 19 in the two countries, and the extent to which a Children’s Rights approach in this area offers new insights. The analysis will suggest that a rights-based approach offers some benefits for a comparative framework and understanding child and family social work, but also that it is not without some difficulties.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherRoutledgeen
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjectchildren's rights;en
dc.subjectchild protectionen
dc.subjectcomparative social worken
dc.titleKevin and Peter: responses to two ‘preventable deaths’en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalEuropean Journal of Social Worken
dc.date.accepted2016-10-
rioxxterms.funderInternalen
rioxxterms.identifier.project181116GSen
rioxxterms.versionAMen
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttps://creativecommons.org/CC BY-NC-ND 4.0en
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2018-05-01en
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