The loss of residual visual memories over the passage of time.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/620286
Title:
The loss of residual visual memories over the passage of time.
Authors:
Mercer, Tom; Duffy, Paul
Abstract:
There has been extensive discussion of the causes of short-term forgetting. Some accounts suggest that time plays an important role in the loss of representations, whereas other models reject this notion and explain all forgetting through interference processes. The present experiment used the recent-probes task to investigate whether residual visual information is lost over the passage of time. On each trial, three unusual target objects were displayed and followed by a probe stimulus. The task was to determine whether the probe matched any of the targets, and the next trial commenced after an intertrial interval lasting 300 ms, 3.3 s, or 8.3 s. Of critical interest were recent negative (RN) trials, on which the probe matched a target from the previous trial. These were contrasted against nonrecent negative (NRN) trials, in which the probe had not been seen in the recent past. RN trials damaged performance and slowed reaction times in comparison to NRN trials, highlighting interference. However, this interfering effect diminished as the intertrial interval was lengthened, suggesting that residual visual information is lost as time passes. This finding is difficult to reconcile with interference-based models and suggests that time plays some role in forgetting.
Citation:
The loss of residual visual memories over the passage of time. 2015, 68 (2):242-8 Q J Exp Psychol (Hove)
Publisher:
Taylor & Francis
Journal:
Quarterly journal of experimental psychology; Volume 68, 2015 - Issue 2
Issue Date:
Nov-2014
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/620286
DOI:
10.1080/17470218.2014.975256
PubMed ID:
25311098
Additional Links:
http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/17470218.2014.975256; http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25311098
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Description:
Mercer, T., & Duffy, P. (2015). The loss of residual visual memories over the passage of time. Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology, 68, 242-248. doi:10.1080/17470218.2014.975256
ISSN:
1747-0226
Sponsors:
University of Wolverhamtpon
Appears in Collections:
FEHW

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorMercer, Tomen
dc.contributor.authorDuffy, Paulen
dc.date.accessioned2016-11-16T16:32:58Z-
dc.date.available2016-11-16T16:32:58Z-
dc.date.issued2014-11-
dc.identifier.citationThe loss of residual visual memories over the passage of time. 2015, 68 (2):242-8 Q J Exp Psychol (Hove)en
dc.identifier.issn1747-0226-
dc.identifier.pmid25311098-
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/17470218.2014.975256-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/620286-
dc.descriptionMercer, T., & Duffy, P. (2015). The loss of residual visual memories over the passage of time. Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology, 68, 242-248. doi:10.1080/17470218.2014.975256en
dc.description.abstractThere has been extensive discussion of the causes of short-term forgetting. Some accounts suggest that time plays an important role in the loss of representations, whereas other models reject this notion and explain all forgetting through interference processes. The present experiment used the recent-probes task to investigate whether residual visual information is lost over the passage of time. On each trial, three unusual target objects were displayed and followed by a probe stimulus. The task was to determine whether the probe matched any of the targets, and the next trial commenced after an intertrial interval lasting 300 ms, 3.3 s, or 8.3 s. Of critical interest were recent negative (RN) trials, on which the probe matched a target from the previous trial. These were contrasted against nonrecent negative (NRN) trials, in which the probe had not been seen in the recent past. RN trials damaged performance and slowed reaction times in comparison to NRN trials, highlighting interference. However, this interfering effect diminished as the intertrial interval was lengthened, suggesting that residual visual information is lost as time passes. This finding is difficult to reconcile with interference-based models and suggests that time plays some role in forgetting.en
dc.description.sponsorshipUniversity of Wolverhamtponen
dc.languageENG-
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherTaylor & Francisen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/17470218.2014.975256en
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25311098en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Quarterly journal of experimental psychology (2006)en
dc.subjectVisual memoryen
dc.subjectforgetting,en
dc.subjecttimeen
dc.subjectshort-term memoryen
dc.subjectrecent-probes tasken
dc.subject.meshAdolescent-
dc.subject.meshAdult-
dc.subject.meshAssociation Learning-
dc.subject.meshFemale-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshMale-
dc.subject.meshMemory Disorders-
dc.subject.meshMiddle Aged-
dc.subject.meshPhotic Stimulation-
dc.subject.meshPsychomotor Performance-
dc.subject.meshReaction Time-
dc.subject.meshRetention (Psychology)-
dc.subject.meshTime Factors-
dc.subject.meshYoung Adult-
dc.titleThe loss of residual visual memories over the passage of time.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalQuarterly journal of experimental psychology; Volume 68, 2015 - Issue 2en

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