Intensive care nurses' experiences of providing end-of-life care after treatment withdrawal: a qualitative study.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/620278
Title:
Intensive care nurses' experiences of providing end-of-life care after treatment withdrawal: a qualitative study.
Authors:
Efstathiou, Nikolaos; Walker, Wendy
Abstract:
Aim and objectives. To explore the experiences of intensive care nurses who provided end-of-life care to adult patients and their families after a decision had been taken to withdraw treatment. Background. End-of-life care following treatment withdrawal is a common phenomenon in intensive care. Less is known about nurses’ experiences of providing care for the dying patient and their family in this context, when compared to specialist palliative care. Design. Descriptive exploratory qualitative study. Methods. A purposive sample of 13 intensive care nurses participated in a semi-structured face-to-face interview. Transcribed data was analysed using the principles of interpretative phenomenological analysis. Results. The essence of nurses’ experiences of providing end-of-life care after the withdrawal of treatment was interpreted as doing the best to facilitate a comfortable and dignified death’. Four master themes included: caring for the dying patient and their family; providing and encouraging presence; reconnecting the patient and family; and dealing with emotions and ambiguity. Uncertainties were evident on processes and actions involved in treatment withdrawal, how to reconnect patients and their family effectively and how to reduce the technological environment. Conclusions. Providing end-of-life care after a decision has been taken to withdraw treatment was a common aspect of intensive care. It was evident that nurses were doing their utmost to support patients and families at the end of life, despite the multiple challenges they faced. Relevance to clinical practice. The interpretive findings from this study should assist intensive care unit nurses to better understand and develop their role in providing high-quality end-of-life care after treatment withdrawal. Practice guidelines should be developed to reduce ambiguity and support the delivery of high-quality care for adults as they approach the final stages of life in intensive care units.
Citation:
Intensive care nurses' experiences of providing end-of-life care after treatment withdrawal: a qualitative study. 2014, 23 (21-22):3188-96 J Clin Nurs
Publisher:
John Wiley & Sons
Journal:
Journal of clinical nursing
Issue Date:
Feb-2014
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/620278
PubMed ID:
25453123
Additional Links:
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/jocn.12565/full
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
0962-1067
Appears in Collections:
FEHW

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorEfstathiou, Nikolaosen
dc.contributor.authorWalker, Wendyen
dc.date.accessioned2016-11-11T14:25:12Z-
dc.date.available2016-11-11T14:25:12Z-
dc.date.issued2014-02-
dc.identifier.citationIntensive care nurses' experiences of providing end-of-life care after treatment withdrawal: a qualitative study. 2014, 23 (21-22):3188-96 J Clin Nursen
dc.identifier.issn0962-1067en
dc.identifier.pmid25453123-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/620278-
dc.description.abstractAim and objectives. To explore the experiences of intensive care nurses who provided end-of-life care to adult patients and their families after a decision had been taken to withdraw treatment. Background. End-of-life care following treatment withdrawal is a common phenomenon in intensive care. Less is known about nurses’ experiences of providing care for the dying patient and their family in this context, when compared to specialist palliative care. Design. Descriptive exploratory qualitative study. Methods. A purposive sample of 13 intensive care nurses participated in a semi-structured face-to-face interview. Transcribed data was analysed using the principles of interpretative phenomenological analysis. Results. The essence of nurses’ experiences of providing end-of-life care after the withdrawal of treatment was interpreted as doing the best to facilitate a comfortable and dignified death’. Four master themes included: caring for the dying patient and their family; providing and encouraging presence; reconnecting the patient and family; and dealing with emotions and ambiguity. Uncertainties were evident on processes and actions involved in treatment withdrawal, how to reconnect patients and their family effectively and how to reduce the technological environment. Conclusions. Providing end-of-life care after a decision has been taken to withdraw treatment was a common aspect of intensive care. It was evident that nurses were doing their utmost to support patients and families at the end of life, despite the multiple challenges they faced. Relevance to clinical practice. The interpretive findings from this study should assist intensive care unit nurses to better understand and develop their role in providing high-quality end-of-life care after treatment withdrawal. Practice guidelines should be developed to reduce ambiguity and support the delivery of high-quality care for adults as they approach the final stages of life in intensive care units.en
dc.languageENG-
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherJohn Wiley & Sonsen
dc.relation.urlhttp://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/jocn.12565/fullen
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Journal of clinical nursingen
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjectcritical careen
dc.subjectend-of-life careen
dc.subjectexperiencesen
dc.subjectintensive care nursesen
dc.subjectinterpretative phenomenological analysisen
dc.subjectwithdrawal of treatmenten
dc.subject.meshAdult-
dc.subject.meshFemale-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshIntensive Care Units-
dc.subject.meshInterviews as Topic-
dc.subject.meshMale-
dc.subject.meshMiddle Aged-
dc.subject.meshNurse-Patient Relations-
dc.subject.meshNursing Staff, Hospital-
dc.subject.meshTerminal Care-
dc.subject.meshWithholding Treatment-
dc.titleIntensive care nurses' experiences of providing end-of-life care after treatment withdrawal: a qualitative study.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalJournal of clinical nursingen
dc.date.accepted2014-01-
rioxxterms.funderInternalen
rioxxterms.identifier.projectUoW111116WWen
rioxxterms.versionAMen
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttps://creativecommons.org/CC BY-NC-ND 4.0en
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2016-11-11en
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