Scaling waist girth for differences in body size reveals a new improved index associated with cardiometabolic risk.

3.00
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/620277
Title:
Scaling waist girth for differences in body size reveals a new improved index associated with cardiometabolic risk.
Authors:
Nevill, Alan M.; Duncan, M J; Lahart, I M; Sandercock, G R
Abstract:
Our aim was to examine whether a new ratio, waist divided by height(0.5) (WHT.5R), is both independent of stature and a stronger predictor of cardiometabolic risk (CMR) than other anthropometric indices. Subjects (4117 men and 646 women), aged 20-69 years, were assessed for stature (cm), mass (kg), waist, and hip girths (cm) from which body mass index (BMI), waist-to-hip ratio (WHR), waist-to-height ratio (WHTR), and two new indices, a body shape index (ABSI) and WHT.5R, were determined. We used the allometric power law, W = a.HT(b) , to obtain a simple body shape index for waist girth (W) to be independent of stature (HT). Physical activity was determined using self-report, and physical fitness was determined using the Bruce protocol. Glucose, total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein, high-density lipoprotein, triglycerides, and TC/HDL ratio were determined from fasting venous blood samples. A single CMR composite score was derived from log-transformed z-scores of Triglycerides + average blood pressure ((diastolic + systolic)/2) + glucose + HDL (*-1). Results confirmed WHT.5R to be independent of stature and the strongest predictor of CMR, compared with BMI, WC, WHR, ABSI, and WHTR. We also found that CMR scores decline significantly with increasing fitness and physical activity, confirming that being fit and active can compensate for the adverse effects of being fat as measured by all other anthropometric indices. In conclusion, WHT.5R was the best anthropometric index associated with CMR, and being both physically fit and active has a protective effect on CMR, irrespective of weight status.
Citation:
Scaling waist girth for differences in body size reveals a new improved index associated with cardiometabolic risk. 2016 Scand J Med Sci Sports
Publisher:
Wiley
Journal:
Scandinavian journal of medicine & science in sports
Issue Date:
10-Oct-2016
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/620277
DOI:
10.1111/sms.12780
PubMed ID:
27726187
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
0905-7188
Appears in Collections:
Sport, Exercise and Health Research Group

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorNevill, Alan M.en
dc.contributor.authorDuncan, M Jen
dc.contributor.authorLahart, I Men
dc.contributor.authorSandercock, G Ren
dc.date.accessioned2016-11-10T16:30:04Z-
dc.date.available2016-11-10T16:30:04Z-
dc.date.issued2016-10-10-
dc.identifier.citationScaling waist girth for differences in body size reveals a new improved index associated with cardiometabolic risk. 2016 Scand J Med Sci Sportsen
dc.identifier.issn0905-7188en
dc.identifier.pmid27726187-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/sms.12780-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/620277-
dc.description.abstractOur aim was to examine whether a new ratio, waist divided by height(0.5) (WHT.5R), is both independent of stature and a stronger predictor of cardiometabolic risk (CMR) than other anthropometric indices. Subjects (4117 men and 646 women), aged 20-69 years, were assessed for stature (cm), mass (kg), waist, and hip girths (cm) from which body mass index (BMI), waist-to-hip ratio (WHR), waist-to-height ratio (WHTR), and two new indices, a body shape index (ABSI) and WHT.5R, were determined. We used the allometric power law, W = a.HT(b) , to obtain a simple body shape index for waist girth (W) to be independent of stature (HT). Physical activity was determined using self-report, and physical fitness was determined using the Bruce protocol. Glucose, total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein, high-density lipoprotein, triglycerides, and TC/HDL ratio were determined from fasting venous blood samples. A single CMR composite score was derived from log-transformed z-scores of Triglycerides + average blood pressure ((diastolic + systolic)/2) + glucose + HDL (*-1). Results confirmed WHT.5R to be independent of stature and the strongest predictor of CMR, compared with BMI, WC, WHR, ABSI, and WHTR. We also found that CMR scores decline significantly with increasing fitness and physical activity, confirming that being fit and active can compensate for the adverse effects of being fat as measured by all other anthropometric indices. In conclusion, WHT.5R was the best anthropometric index associated with CMR, and being both physically fit and active has a protective effect on CMR, irrespective of weight status.en
dc.languageENG-
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherWileyen
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Scandinavian journal of medicine & science in sportsen
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjectWaist-to-height 0.5 ratioen
dc.subjectallometric power lawen
dc.subjectwaist-to-height ratioen
dc.subjectcentralized obesityen
dc.titleScaling waist girth for differences in body size reveals a new improved index associated with cardiometabolic risk.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalScandinavian journal of medicine & science in sportsen
dc.date.accepted2016-08-26-
rioxxterms.funderInternalen
rioxxterms.identifier.projectUOW101116ANen
rioxxterms.versionAMen
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/en
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2017-10-10en
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