2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/620269
Title:
Online mood profiling and self-regulation of affective responses
Authors:
Lane, Andrew M.; Terry, P. C.
Abstract:
The link between affective responses and performance in sports is well established (Beedie, Terry, & Lane, 2000; Hanin, 1997, 2010) and it is not uncommon for athletes to attribute poor performance to an inability to get into the right mood or to keep their emotions in check. Such reflections suggest that individuals are able to identify an optimal mindset for performance and that self-regulation of psychological states is a feature of preparation for competition. The present chapter explores strategies that athletes might use to generate their optimal mindset, including an online method of mood profiling that enables athletes to monitor how they feel, to consider whether that is how they want to feel, and offers suggested self-regulation strategies.
Citation:
In: Schinke, R. J., McGannon, K. R., & Smith, B. Routledge International Handbook of Sport Psychology, Routledge, London. 324-33
Publisher:
Routledge
Issue Date:
Feb-2016
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/620269
Type:
Book chapter
Language:
en
ISBN:
978-1138022423
Appears in Collections:
Sport Performance

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorLane, Andrew M.en
dc.contributor.authorTerry, P. C.en
dc.date.accessioned2016-11-07T15:38:32Z-
dc.date.available2016-11-07T15:38:32Z-
dc.date.issued2016-02-
dc.identifier.citationIn: Schinke, R. J., McGannon, K. R., & Smith, B. Routledge International Handbook of Sport Psychology, Routledge, London. 324-33en
dc.identifier.isbn978-1138022423-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/620269-
dc.description.abstractThe link between affective responses and performance in sports is well established (Beedie, Terry, & Lane, 2000; Hanin, 1997, 2010) and it is not uncommon for athletes to attribute poor performance to an inability to get into the right mood or to keep their emotions in check. Such reflections suggest that individuals are able to identify an optimal mindset for performance and that self-regulation of psychological states is a feature of preparation for competition. The present chapter explores strategies that athletes might use to generate their optimal mindset, including an online method of mood profiling that enables athletes to monitor how they feel, to consider whether that is how they want to feel, and offers suggested self-regulation strategies.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherRoutledgeen
dc.subjectMooden
dc.subjectemotionen
dc.subjectself-regulationen
dc.titleOnline mood profiling and self-regulation of affective responsesen
dc.typeBook chapteren
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