Listening to old wives’ tales: small stories and the (re)making and (re)telling of research in HE/FE practitioner education

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/620232
Title:
Listening to old wives’ tales: small stories and the (re)making and (re)telling of research in HE/FE practitioner education
Authors:
Kendall, Alex; Gibson, Melanie; Himsworth, Clare; Palmer, Kirsty; Perkins, Helen ( 0000-0001-7344-8867 )
Abstract:
In this paper we share the outcomes of a project that sought to take up Nutbrown’s challenge to ‘push out from the safe(er) boundaries of established methodologies’ in early years research. We explore the value of auto-ethnographic storytelling, Lyotard’s ‘petit récit’, to the processes of doing and learning about research in the context of practitioner education. We offer a rationale for the use of creative methods in (post?) professional learning and describe the process of working with identity boxes and symbolic objects, to produce a collection of auto-ethnographic narratives, the old wives’ tales of the title, through which to explore practitioners’ experiences of professional identity formation. We consider the opportunities such methods offer for reflexive learning about practitioner positionality within the knowledge-making practices of research and attempt to (re)position ourselves differently as writers and makers of research. Towards a conclusion we review and theorise meanings participant-researchers make about their career trajectories and proffer auto-ethnography as a dynamic modality for practitioner learning. We mobilise Patti Lather’s notion of methodological proliferation to re-think practitioner education as a wild profusion of post-professional possibilities.
Citation:
Listening to old wives’ tales: small stories and the (re)making and (re)telling of research in HE/FE practitioner education 2016, 21 (1-2):116 Research in Post-Compulsory Education
Publisher:
Taylor & Francis
Journal:
Research in Post-Compulsory Education
Issue Date:
3-Mar-2016
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/620232
DOI:
10.1080/13596748.2015.1126933
Additional Links:
http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/13596748.2015.1126933
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
1359-6748; 1747-5112
Appears in Collections:
FEHW

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorKendall, Alexen
dc.contributor.authorGibson, Melanieen
dc.contributor.authorHimsworth, Clareen
dc.contributor.authorPalmer, Kirstyen
dc.contributor.authorPerkins, Helenen
dc.date.accessioned2016-10-24T10:57:26Z-
dc.date.available2016-10-24T10:57:26Z-
dc.date.issued2016-03-03-
dc.identifier.citationListening to old wives’ tales: small stories and the (re)making and (re)telling of research in HE/FE practitioner education 2016, 21 (1-2):116 Research in Post-Compulsory Educationen
dc.identifier.issn1359-6748-
dc.identifier.issn1747-5112-
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/13596748.2015.1126933-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/620232-
dc.description.abstractIn this paper we share the outcomes of a project that sought to take up Nutbrown’s challenge to ‘push out from the safe(er) boundaries of established methodologies’ in early years research. We explore the value of auto-ethnographic storytelling, Lyotard’s ‘petit récit’, to the processes of doing and learning about research in the context of practitioner education. We offer a rationale for the use of creative methods in (post?) professional learning and describe the process of working with identity boxes and symbolic objects, to produce a collection of auto-ethnographic narratives, the old wives’ tales of the title, through which to explore practitioners’ experiences of professional identity formation. We consider the opportunities such methods offer for reflexive learning about practitioner positionality within the knowledge-making practices of research and attempt to (re)position ourselves differently as writers and makers of research. Towards a conclusion we review and theorise meanings participant-researchers make about their career trajectories and proffer auto-ethnography as a dynamic modality for practitioner learning. We mobilise Patti Lather’s notion of methodological proliferation to re-think practitioner education as a wild profusion of post-professional possibilities.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherTaylor & Francisen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/13596748.2015.1126933en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Research in Post-Compulsory Educationen
dc.subjectresearch methodsen
dc.subjectpractitioner educationen
dc.subjectpost-professionalismen
dc.subjectwriting differentlyen
dc.subjectearly years workforceen
dc.subjectstudents as partners in academic writingen
dc.subjectcreative research methodsen
dc.subjectauto-ethnographic narrativesen
dc.titleListening to old wives’ tales: small stories and the (re)making and (re)telling of research in HE/FE practitioner educationen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalResearch in Post-Compulsory Educationen
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