A comparative study on the clinical decision making processes of nurse practitioners versus medical doctors using scenarios within a secondary care environment

2.00
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/620218
Title:
A comparative study on the clinical decision making processes of nurse practitioners versus medical doctors using scenarios within a secondary care environment
Authors:
Thompson, Stephen; Barratt, Julian; Moorley, Calvin
Abstract:
Subjects This study was conducted from May 2012 to January 2013.Aim To investigate the decision-making skills of secondary care nurse practitioners compared to those of medical doctors.Background A literature review was conducted, searching for articles published from 1990 to 2012. The review found that nurse practitioners are key to the modernisation of the National Health Service. Studies have shown that compared to doctors, nurse practitioners can be efficient and cost-effective in consultations.Design Qualitative research design. Methods The information processing theory and think-aloud approach were used to understand the cognitive processes of 10 participants (5 doctors and 5 nurse practitioners). One nurse practitioner was paired with one doctor from the same speciality, and they were compared using a structured scenario-based interview. To ensure that all critical and relevant cues were covered by the individual participating in the scenario, a reference model was used to measure the degree of successful diagnosis, management and treatment.Results The data were processed for 5 months, from July to November 2012. The two groups of practitioners differed in the number of cue acquisitions obtained in the scenarios. In our study, nurse practitioners took three minutes longer to complete the scenarios. Conclusion This study suggests that nurse practitioner consultations are comparable to those of medical doctors within a secondary care environment in terms of correct diagnoses and therapeutic treatments. The information processing theory highlighted that both groups of professionals had similar models for decision-making processes.
Publisher:
Wiley
Journal:
Journal of Advanced Nursing
Issue Date:
Dec-2016
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/620218
Additional Links:
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/jan.2016.72.issue-11/issuetoc
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
0309-2402
Sponsors:
NHS
Appears in Collections:
FEHW

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorThompson, Stephenen
dc.contributor.authorBarratt, Julian-
dc.contributor.authorMoorley, Calvin-
dc.date.accessioned2016-10-18T08:56:16Z-
dc.date.available2016-10-18T08:56:16Z-
dc.date.issued2016-12-
dc.identifier.issn0309-2402en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/620218-
dc.description.abstractSubjects This study was conducted from May 2012 to January 2013.Aim To investigate the decision-making skills of secondary care nurse practitioners compared to those of medical doctors.Background A literature review was conducted, searching for articles published from 1990 to 2012. The review found that nurse practitioners are key to the modernisation of the National Health Service. Studies have shown that compared to doctors, nurse practitioners can be efficient and cost-effective in consultations.Design Qualitative research design. Methods The information processing theory and think-aloud approach were used to understand the cognitive processes of 10 participants (5 doctors and 5 nurse practitioners). One nurse practitioner was paired with one doctor from the same speciality, and they were compared using a structured scenario-based interview. To ensure that all critical and relevant cues were covered by the individual participating in the scenario, a reference model was used to measure the degree of successful diagnosis, management and treatment.Results The data were processed for 5 months, from July to November 2012. The two groups of practitioners differed in the number of cue acquisitions obtained in the scenarios. In our study, nurse practitioners took three minutes longer to complete the scenarios. Conclusion This study suggests that nurse practitioner consultations are comparable to those of medical doctors within a secondary care environment in terms of correct diagnoses and therapeutic treatments. The information processing theory highlighted that both groups of professionals had similar models for decision-making processes.en
dc.description.sponsorshipNHSen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherWileyen
dc.relation.urlhttp://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/jan.2016.72.issue-11/issuetocen
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjectnurse practitionersen
dc.subjectclinical decision makingen
dc.subjectadvanced nursing practiceen
dc.subjectclinical reasoningen
dc.subjectinformation processing theoryen
dc.subjectthink-aloud approachen
dc.titleA comparative study on the clinical decision making processes of nurse practitioners versus medical doctors using scenarios within a secondary care environmenten
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Advanced Nursingen
dc.date.accepted2016-10-
rioxxterms.funderNHSen
rioxxterms.identifier.project181016JBen
rioxxterms.versionAMen
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttps://creativecommons.org/CC BY-NC-ND 4.0en
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2018-01-01en
This item is licensed under a Creative Commons License
Creative Commons
All Items in WIRE are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.