Discourse, identity and socialisation: a textual analysis of the ‘accounts’ of student social workers

5.00
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/620210
Title:
Discourse, identity and socialisation: a textual analysis of the ‘accounts’ of student social workers
Authors:
Roscoe, Karen
Abstract:
This article draws on interview data from student social workers engaged in assessing the needs of adults in Wales, UK. The data were collected as part of a doctoral study conducted by the lead author (Roscoe, 2014), which utilised a form of discourse analysis to explore students’ accounts as ‘texts’. The concept of ‘text’ refers to an account, exchange or narrative and can be interpreted at a number of levels (Halliday, 1978). Texts represent personal, occupational and professional domains of meaning, and through textual analysis, we can grasp the way occupational identity and day-to-day practices are constructed through subjective and institutional sets of knowledge, values and beliefs. This article will draw upon Fairclough’s (1989) method of critical discourse analysis to explore and interpret student texts and, in doing so, will reveal their multilayered character in respect of cultural, social and political influences.
Citation:
Discourse, identity and socialisation: a textual analysis of the ‘accounts’ of student social workers 2016 Critical and Radical Social Work
Journal:
Critical and Radical Social Work
Issue Date:
Oct-2016
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/620210
DOI:
10.1332/204986016X14761129779307
Additional Links:
http://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/tpp/crsw/pre-prints/content-ppcrswd1600017r2
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
2049 8608
Appears in Collections:
FEHW

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorRoscoe, Karenen
dc.date.accessioned2016-10-14T14:47:12Z-
dc.date.available2016-10-14T14:47:12Z-
dc.date.issued2016-10-
dc.identifier.citationDiscourse, identity and socialisation: a textual analysis of the ‘accounts’ of student social workers 2016 Critical and Radical Social Worken
dc.identifier.issn2049 8608en
dc.identifier.doi10.1332/204986016X14761129779307-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/620210-
dc.description.abstractThis article draws on interview data from student social workers engaged in assessing the needs of adults in Wales, UK. The data were collected as part of a doctoral study conducted by the lead author (Roscoe, 2014), which utilised a form of discourse analysis to explore students’ accounts as ‘texts’. The concept of ‘text’ refers to an account, exchange or narrative and can be interpreted at a number of levels (Halliday, 1978). Texts represent personal, occupational and professional domains of meaning, and through textual analysis, we can grasp the way occupational identity and day-to-day practices are constructed through subjective and institutional sets of knowledge, values and beliefs. This article will draw upon Fairclough’s (1989) method of critical discourse analysis to explore and interpret student texts and, in doing so, will reveal their multilayered character in respect of cultural, social and political influences.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/tpp/crsw/pre-prints/content-ppcrswd1600017r2en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Critical and Radical Social Worken
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjectcritical discourse analysisen
dc.subjectidentityen
dc.subjectprofessional socialisationen
dc.subjectgenresen
dc.titleDiscourse, identity and socialisation: a textual analysis of the ‘accounts’ of student social workersen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalCritical and Radical Social Worken
dc.date.accepted2016-10-
rioxxterms.funderInternalen
rioxxterms.identifier.project141016KRen
rioxxterms.versionAMen
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttps://creativecommons.org/CC BY-NC-ND 4.0en
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2017-10-10en
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