2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/620178
Title:
Inclusion in an age of mobility
Authors:
Traxler, John ( 0000-0002-5284-709X )
Abstract:
Learning with mobiles in UK universities is not new and is not novel. It is, in fact, at least 10 years old, well-documented and comparable to activity in universities elsewhere in Western Europe, America and Asia Pacific. Continued and dramatic changes in the ownership, access and expectations of mobiles amongst university students and equally across UK society have suddenly propelled learning with mobiles to centre-stage as a feasible proposition but, it is now argued, only if students can bring-your-own-device. This has already catalysed discussion about authority, agency and control within university settings but the equally significant and profound implications for the inclusion agenda have not been articulated. This paper begins that process. A theoretical framework for social inclusion in this context is considered, identified and discussed. The paper reviews the progress and problems of the substantial and unique programme of mobile learning across UK higher education since 2000 in relation to its stance on inclusion, where this is apparent. These are all well-documented in academic and official sources; the paper does however also draw on the author’s involvement in many of the events and initiatives. The paper raises however significant questions about this programme’s meaning and direction in a world where now there is more, better, cheaper, faster, newer but different digital technology in the hands of students, potential students and everyone else than there is routinely in the educational institutions themselves. This digital technology, mobile technology, now allows learners to create, own, transform, discuss, discard, share, store and broadcast ideas, opinions, images and information, and to create and transform identities and communities. The paper argues that this epistemological revolution may mean that universities and colleges are no longer credible and authoritative gatekeepers to knowledge and its technologies and so the meaning and relevance of inclusion are much less clear. The paper proposes a new stance on inclusion.
Citation:
Inclusion in an age of mobility 2016, 24 (0) Research in Learning Technology
Publisher:
co-action publishing
Journal:
Research in Learning Technology, vol 24, 2016
Issue Date:
12-Aug-2016
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/620178
DOI:
10.3402/rlt.v24.31372
Additional Links:
http://www.researchinlearningtechnology.net/index.php/rlt/article/view/31372
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
2156-7069
Appears in Collections:
FEHW

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorTraxler, Johnen
dc.date.accessioned2016-10-05T15:26:28Z-
dc.date.available2016-10-05T15:26:28Z-
dc.date.issued2016-08-12-
dc.identifier.citationInclusion in an age of mobility 2016, 24 (0) Research in Learning Technologyen
dc.identifier.issn2156-7069en
dc.identifier.doi10.3402/rlt.v24.31372-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/620178-
dc.description.abstractLearning with mobiles in UK universities is not new and is not novel. It is, in fact, at least 10 years old, well-documented and comparable to activity in universities elsewhere in Western Europe, America and Asia Pacific. Continued and dramatic changes in the ownership, access and expectations of mobiles amongst university students and equally across UK society have suddenly propelled learning with mobiles to centre-stage as a feasible proposition but, it is now argued, only if students can bring-your-own-device. This has already catalysed discussion about authority, agency and control within university settings but the equally significant and profound implications for the inclusion agenda have not been articulated. This paper begins that process. A theoretical framework for social inclusion in this context is considered, identified and discussed. The paper reviews the progress and problems of the substantial and unique programme of mobile learning across UK higher education since 2000 in relation to its stance on inclusion, where this is apparent. These are all well-documented in academic and official sources; the paper does however also draw on the author’s involvement in many of the events and initiatives. The paper raises however significant questions about this programme’s meaning and direction in a world where now there is more, better, cheaper, faster, newer but different digital technology in the hands of students, potential students and everyone else than there is routinely in the educational institutions themselves. This digital technology, mobile technology, now allows learners to create, own, transform, discuss, discard, share, store and broadcast ideas, opinions, images and information, and to create and transform identities and communities. The paper argues that this epistemological revolution may mean that universities and colleges are no longer credible and authoritative gatekeepers to knowledge and its technologies and so the meaning and relevance of inclusion are much less clear. The paper proposes a new stance on inclusion.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherco-action publishingen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.researchinlearningtechnology.net/index.php/rlt/article/view/31372en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Research in Learning Technologyen
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjectmobilityen
dc.subjectinclusionen
dc.subjectmobile learningen
dc.subjectparticipationen
dc.subjectbring-your-own-deviceen
dc.titleInclusion in an age of mobilityen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalResearch in Learning Technology, vol 24, 2016en
dc.date.accepted2016-06-
rioxxterms.funderInternalen
rioxxterms.identifier.projectUoW051016JTen
rioxxterms.versionVoRen
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttps://creativecommons.org/CC BY-NC-ND 4.0en
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2016-10-05en
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