2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/620170
Title:
Police pay-contested and contestable
Authors:
Mather, Kim; Seifert, Roger
Abstract:
This paper provides an analysis of developments in the determination of police pay. It reveals the contested nature of public sector pay setting where the government of the day is given to short-term economic goals over and above any long-term approach to resolving staffing issues in the essential public services. In the case of the police, the Police Federation of England and Wales (PFEW) has traditionally used both industrial and political methods to put pressure on key government decision-makers. Developments reveal increasingly fraught relations between the police and the government, with the 2008 pay dispute in particular remarking a key point of deterioration in this set of relations. Once it became clear after the 2010 general election that the government would ignore industrial pressure then the PFEW felt driven to increase the activities of its political arm. This ultimately backfired with Plebgate leaving them naked in the negotiating chamber
Citation:
Police pay-contested and contestable 2016, 47 (3):204 Industrial Relations Journal
Publisher:
Wiley
Journal:
Industrial Relations Journal, Vol 47(3), pp204-219
Issue Date:
Apr-2016
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/620170
DOI:
10.1111/irj.12140
Additional Links:
http://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/irj.12140
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
0019-8692
Appears in Collections:
FOSS

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorMather, Kimen
dc.contributor.authorSeifert, Rogeren
dc.date.accessioned2016-09-20T14:28:56Z-
dc.date.available2016-09-20T14:28:56Z-
dc.date.issued2016-04-
dc.identifier.citationPolice pay-contested and contestable 2016, 47 (3):204 Industrial Relations Journalen
dc.identifier.issn0019-8692en
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/irj.12140-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/620170-
dc.description.abstractThis paper provides an analysis of developments in the determination of police pay. It reveals the contested nature of public sector pay setting where the government of the day is given to short-term economic goals over and above any long-term approach to resolving staffing issues in the essential public services. In the case of the police, the Police Federation of England and Wales (PFEW) has traditionally used both industrial and political methods to put pressure on key government decision-makers. Developments reveal increasingly fraught relations between the police and the government, with the 2008 pay dispute in particular remarking a key point of deterioration in this set of relations. Once it became clear after the 2010 general election that the government would ignore industrial pressure then the PFEW felt driven to increase the activities of its political arm. This ultimately backfired with Plebgate leaving them naked in the negotiating chamberen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherWileyen
dc.relation.urlhttp://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/irj.12140en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Industrial Relations Journalen
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjectPolice Payen
dc.titlePolice pay-contested and contestableen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalIndustrial Relations Journal, Vol 47(3), pp204-219en
dc.contributor.institutionHRM and IR Group; Keele Management School; Keele Staffs Keele ST5 5BG UK-
dc.contributor.institutionHRM and IR Group; Keele Management School; Keele Staffs Keele ST5 5BG UK-
dc.date.accepted2016-04-
rioxxterms.funderInternalen
rioxxterms.identifier.projectUoW200916RSen
rioxxterms.versionAMen
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttps://creativecommons.org/CC BY-NC-ND 4.0en
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2018-05-26en
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