Experimentation and Post-Heritage in Contemporary TV Drama: Parade’s End

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/620114
Title:
Experimentation and Post-Heritage in Contemporary TV Drama: Parade’s End
Authors:
HOCKENHULL, STELLA ( 0000-0003-4559-2401 )
Abstract:
At the beginning of Episode Three of Tom Stoppard’s adaptation of Ford Madox Ford’s 1920s’ tetralogy, Parade’s End (White 2012), the central character, Christopher Tietjens (Benedict Cumberbatch) lies in hospital wounded, suffering flashbacks to his First World War experiences in the trenches. The sequence commences with an extreme close-up of his bloodied face, before a dissolve introduces a kaleidoscopic and bleached image of his beautiful wife, Sylvia (Rebecca Hall). This shot is immediately followed by that of Tietjens’s lover, Valentine Wannop (Adelaide Clemens), before returning to the more realistic and gruesome events at the hospital. The story chronicles the life of Christopher Tietjens, a wealthy landowner and man of principles, and his promiscuous socialite wife, Sylvia. Tietjens has joined up to fight, but the events which occur in the war form only one layer of the complex plot and backdrop to the love triangle with suffragette, Valentine. The flashback and the optical effect of the kaleidoscope is a repeated motif in the serial, and director, Susanna White, introduces a variety of experimental, surreal and perplexing images throughout this fast moving drama.
Citation:
In: James Leggott and Julie Taddeo (Editor); Upstairs and Downstairs: British Costume Drama Television from the Forsyte Saga to Downton Abbey; chapter 14, p191
Publisher:
Rowman & Littlefield
Issue Date:
2014
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/620114
Additional Links:
https://www.amazon.co.uk/Upstairs-Downstairs-British-Costume-Television/dp/1442244828
Type:
Book chapter
Language:
en
ISBN:
9781442244825
Appears in Collections:
Media and PR

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorHOCKENHULL, STELLAen
dc.date.accessioned2016-09-13T14:52:57Z-
dc.date.available2016-09-13T14:52:57Z-
dc.date.issued2014-
dc.identifier.citationIn: James Leggott and Julie Taddeo (Editor); Upstairs and Downstairs: British Costume Drama Television from the Forsyte Saga to Downton Abbey; chapter 14, p191en
dc.identifier.isbn9781442244825-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/620114-
dc.description.abstractAt the beginning of Episode Three of Tom Stoppard’s adaptation of Ford Madox Ford’s 1920s’ tetralogy, Parade’s End (White 2012), the central character, Christopher Tietjens (Benedict Cumberbatch) lies in hospital wounded, suffering flashbacks to his First World War experiences in the trenches. The sequence commences with an extreme close-up of his bloodied face, before a dissolve introduces a kaleidoscopic and bleached image of his beautiful wife, Sylvia (Rebecca Hall). This shot is immediately followed by that of Tietjens’s lover, Valentine Wannop (Adelaide Clemens), before returning to the more realistic and gruesome events at the hospital. The story chronicles the life of Christopher Tietjens, a wealthy landowner and man of principles, and his promiscuous socialite wife, Sylvia. Tietjens has joined up to fight, but the events which occur in the war form only one layer of the complex plot and backdrop to the love triangle with suffragette, Valentine. The flashback and the optical effect of the kaleidoscope is a repeated motif in the serial, and director, Susanna White, introduces a variety of experimental, surreal and perplexing images throughout this fast moving drama.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherRowman & Littlefielden
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.amazon.co.uk/Upstairs-Downstairs-British-Costume-Television/dp/1442244828en
dc.subjectExperimentationen
dc.subjectPost-Heritageen
dc.subjectContemporary TV Dramaen
dc.subjectParade’s Enden
dc.subjectQuality Dramaen
dc.subjectMasterpieceen
dc.subjectCostume Dramaen
dc.subjectDowntonen
dc.subjectAdaptationen
dc.titleExperimentation and Post-Heritage in Contemporary TV Drama: Parade’s Enden
dc.typeBook chapteren
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