The impact of Operation Sophia on the exercise of criminal jurisdiction against migrant smugglers and human traffickers

4.00
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/619834
Title:
The impact of Operation Sophia on the exercise of criminal jurisdiction against migrant smugglers and human traffickers
Authors:
Ventrella, Matilde
Abstract:
Following the incident of April 2015, when 800 people lost their life in the Mediterranean Sea, the EU has concentrated its efforts on fighting the smuggling of migrants by sea, with the European Council emphasising that all efforts should be made to prevent the loss of life in the sea, including by cooperating with transit and origin countries of migrants.[1] Hence, in May 2015, a EU Council Decision (Council) on the military operation called EU Naval Force for the Mediterranean Sea (EUNAVFOR MED) was adopted in order to detect the smuggling of migrants in the Southern Central Mediterranean Sea.[2] The military operation was renamed Sophia after a baby who was born on a boat which was rescued by the EUNAVFOR MED (Operation Sophia), on 22 August 2015.[3] On 20 June 2016, the Council extended Operation Sophia’s mandate until 27 July 2017, reinforcing it by adding two supporting tasks, namely: training of the Libyan coastguard and navy; and contributing to the implementation of the UN arms embargo on the high seas off the coast of Libya[4]. The aim of the Decision is ‘to identify, capture and destroy vessels before they are used by traffickers’[5] and consists of three phases which are analysed in section 2 of this article. Ten months after Operation Sophia transitioned from phase 1 to phase 2 and after the adoption of UN Security Council resolution 2240 (2105), it is opportune to evaluate the effectiveness of the Operation.
Publisher:
Editoriale Scientifica, Via San Biagio dei Librai 39 – 80138 Napol
Journal:
QIL (Questions of International Law)
Issue Date:
Aug-2016
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/619834
Additional Links:
http://www.qil-qdi.org/impact-operation-sophia-exercise-criminal-jurisdiction-migrant-smugglers-human-traffickers/
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
2284-2969
Appears in Collections:
FOSS

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorVentrella, Matildeen
dc.date.accessioned2016-09-05T09:29:22Z-
dc.date.available2016-09-05T09:29:22Z-
dc.date.issued2016-08-
dc.identifier.issn2284-2969en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/619834-
dc.description.abstractFollowing the incident of April 2015, when 800 people lost their life in the Mediterranean Sea, the EU has concentrated its efforts on fighting the smuggling of migrants by sea, with the European Council emphasising that all efforts should be made to prevent the loss of life in the sea, including by cooperating with transit and origin countries of migrants.[1] Hence, in May 2015, a EU Council Decision (Council) on the military operation called EU Naval Force for the Mediterranean Sea (EUNAVFOR MED) was adopted in order to detect the smuggling of migrants in the Southern Central Mediterranean Sea.[2] The military operation was renamed Sophia after a baby who was born on a boat which was rescued by the EUNAVFOR MED (Operation Sophia), on 22 August 2015.[3] On 20 June 2016, the Council extended Operation Sophia’s mandate until 27 July 2017, reinforcing it by adding two supporting tasks, namely: training of the Libyan coastguard and navy; and contributing to the implementation of the UN arms embargo on the high seas off the coast of Libya[4]. The aim of the Decision is ‘to identify, capture and destroy vessels before they are used by traffickers’[5] and consists of three phases which are analysed in section 2 of this article. Ten months after Operation Sophia transitioned from phase 1 to phase 2 and after the adoption of UN Security Council resolution 2240 (2105), it is opportune to evaluate the effectiveness of the Operation.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherEditoriale Scientifica, Via San Biagio dei Librai 39 – 80138 Napolen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.qil-qdi.org/impact-operation-sophia-exercise-criminal-jurisdiction-migrant-smugglers-human-traffickers/en
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjectsmuggling of migrantsen
dc.subjecthuman traffickingen
dc.titleThe impact of Operation Sophia on the exercise of criminal jurisdiction against migrant smugglers and human traffickersen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalQIL (Questions of International Law)en
dc.date.accepted2016-08-
rioxxterms.funderInternaten
rioxxterms.identifier.projectUoW040916MVen
rioxxterms.versionVoRen
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttps://creativecommons.org/CC BY-NC-ND 4.0en
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2016-09-04en
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