Are citations from clinical trials evidence of higher impact research? An analysis of ClinicalTrials.gov

4.00
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/619119
Title:
Are citations from clinical trials evidence of higher impact research? An analysis of ClinicalTrials.gov
Authors:
Thelwall, Mike ( 0000-0001-6065-205X ) ; Kousha, Kayvan
Abstract:
An important way in which medical research can translate into improved health outcomes is by motivating or influencing clinical trials that eventually lead to changes in clinical practice. Citations from clinical trials records to academic research may therefore serve as an early warning of the likely future influence of the cited articles. This paper partially assesses this hypothesis by testing whether prior articles referenced in ClinicalTrials.gov records are more highly cited than average for the publishing journal. The results from four high profile general medical journals support the hypothesis, although there may not be a cause-and effect relationship. Nevertheless, it is reasonable for researchers to use citations to their work from clinical trials records as partial evidence of the possible long-term impact of their research.
Publisher:
Springer
Journal:
Scientometrics, 109(2), 1341-1351
Issue Date:
Sep-2016
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/619119
DOI:
10.1007/s11192-016-2112-1
Additional Links:
http://link.springer.com/journal/volumesAndIssues/11192
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
0138-9130
Appears in Collections:
Statistical Cybermetrics Research Group

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorThelwall, Mikeen
dc.contributor.authorKousha, Kayvanen
dc.date.accessioned2016-08-31T12:00:05Z-
dc.date.available2016-08-31T12:00:05Z-
dc.date.issued2016-09-
dc.identifier.issn0138-9130en
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s11192-016-2112-1-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/619119-
dc.description.abstractAn important way in which medical research can translate into improved health outcomes is by motivating or influencing clinical trials that eventually lead to changes in clinical practice. Citations from clinical trials records to academic research may therefore serve as an early warning of the likely future influence of the cited articles. This paper partially assesses this hypothesis by testing whether prior articles referenced in ClinicalTrials.gov records are more highly cited than average for the publishing journal. The results from four high profile general medical journals support the hypothesis, although there may not be a cause-and effect relationship. Nevertheless, it is reasonable for researchers to use citations to their work from clinical trials records as partial evidence of the possible long-term impact of their research.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherSpringeren
dc.relation.urlhttp://link.springer.com/journal/volumesAndIssues/11192en
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjectCitation analysisen
dc.subjectaltmetricsen
dc.subjectalternative metricsen
dc.subjectclinical trialsen
dc.subjectmedical researchen
dc.titleAre citations from clinical trials evidence of higher impact research? An analysis of ClinicalTrials.goven
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalScientometrics, 109(2), 1341-1351en
dc.date.accepted2016-08-22-
rioxxterms.funderInternalen
rioxxterms.identifier.projectUoW310816MTen
rioxxterms.versionAMen
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttps://creativecommons.org/CC BY-NC-ND 4.0en
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2016-09-01en
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