Ideation and Photography: A critique of François Laruelle’s concept of abstraction

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/618596
Title:
Ideation and Photography: A critique of François Laruelle’s concept of abstraction
Authors:
Roberts, John
Abstract:
In Concept of Non-Photography (2011) and Photo-Fiction (2012), François Laruelle, outlines a theory of photographic abstraction that breaks completely with the debate on realism in photographic theory. Refusing to see photographic representation as involving any concession to resemblance (photographs have more in common with other photographs than with the objects they depict, he declares), he inflates the notion of the photograph as a symbolic entity into a transcendental theoretical domain. This is the result of his radical (non-philosophical) separation of appearances from truth (nothing stands ‘behind’ photographs he asserts). If this inflates photographs-as-abstractions as a form of rich ‘unlimited theoretical’ production, it also deflates them as social discursive entities, that ‘give and ask for reasons’. The result is a post-dialectical flattening of photographic appearances, in which images run in one-dimensional ‘parallel’ with the world. Laruelle’s attempt to release photography from mere appearances, produces a socially deracinated account of abstraction.
Citation:
Ideation and Photography: A critique of François Laruelle’s concept of abstraction 2016, 9 (2):217 Photographies
Publisher:
Taylor & Francis
Journal:
Photographies
Issue Date:
20-Jul-2016
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/618596
DOI:
10.1080/17540763.2016.1188138
Additional Links:
http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/17540763.2016.1188138
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
1754-0763
Appears in Collections:
FOA

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorRoberts, Johnen
dc.date.accessioned2016-08-19T11:51:16Z-
dc.date.available2016-08-19T11:51:16Z-
dc.date.issued2016-07-20-
dc.identifier.citationIdeation and Photography: A critique of François Laruelle’s concept of abstraction 2016, 9 (2):217 Photographiesen
dc.identifier.issn1754-0763en
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/17540763.2016.1188138-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/618596-
dc.description.abstractIn Concept of Non-Photography (2011) and Photo-Fiction (2012), François Laruelle, outlines a theory of photographic abstraction that breaks completely with the debate on realism in photographic theory. Refusing to see photographic representation as involving any concession to resemblance (photographs have more in common with other photographs than with the objects they depict, he declares), he inflates the notion of the photograph as a symbolic entity into a transcendental theoretical domain. This is the result of his radical (non-philosophical) separation of appearances from truth (nothing stands ‘behind’ photographs he asserts). If this inflates photographs-as-abstractions as a form of rich ‘unlimited theoretical’ production, it also deflates them as social discursive entities, that ‘give and ask for reasons’. The result is a post-dialectical flattening of photographic appearances, in which images run in one-dimensional ‘parallel’ with the world. Laruelle’s attempt to release photography from mere appearances, produces a socially deracinated account of abstraction.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherTaylor & Francisen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/17540763.2016.1188138en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Photographiesen
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.titleIdeation and Photography: A critique of François Laruelle’s concept of abstractionen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalPhotographiesen
dc.date.accepted2016-05-03-
rioxxterms.funderInternalen
rioxxterms.identifier.projectUOW190816JRen
rioxxterms.versionAMen
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/en
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2018-01-20en
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