The impact of emerging technologies in supporting urban resilience planning in Canada

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/617781
Title:
The impact of emerging technologies in supporting urban resilience planning in Canada
Authors:
Alwan, Oruba
Abstract:
Climate change, fast population growth, income inequality and political unrest make resilience a priority for every city in the world. Resilience is what will decide whether cities or indeed countries, preserve their quality of life, economic wealth and, in some cases, their political integrity. The aim of this research is to provide a framework to describe best practices in urban resilience within Canada, which can then serve as a guide for those willing to develop such practices in their own cities. There are four objectives of this study: 1) a critical review of technologies that can be used to support resilience, including big data and advanced computing; 2) completion of a pilot study in Canada, which looks into the approaches to resilience in a developed country; 3) polling of three major cities in Canada to determine their best practices for building resilience; and 4) development of a guide to support resilience implementation measures. Two data collection methods were used, primary and secondary research. Secondary research was used to gather information from Canadian and foreign published academic literature. Primary research was performed with data collected from cities of Mississauga and Toronto, Ontario; Calgary, Alberta; and Vancouver, British Columbia. These primary data were analyzed using factor analysis, as the data collected were textual rather than numeric in nature. The main contribution of this research was the development of a framework for resilience containing five main features: cost, training, software, security and big data; with three components under each feature. The framework proposed can be used as the basis for the development of a toolkit for cities, which could help to evaluate how compliant cities are with implementing resilience measures.
Issue Date:
Mar-2016
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/617781
Type:
Thesis
Language:
en
Description:
A thesis submitted in partial fulfilment of the requirements of University of Wolverhampton for the degree of Master of Philosophy
Appears in Collections:
E-Theses

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorAlwan, Orubaen
dc.date.accessioned2016-08-01T08:50:40Z-
dc.date.available2016-08-01T08:50:40Z-
dc.date.issued2016-03-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/617781-
dc.descriptionA thesis submitted in partial fulfilment of the requirements of University of Wolverhampton for the degree of Master of Philosophyen
dc.description.abstractClimate change, fast population growth, income inequality and political unrest make resilience a priority for every city in the world. Resilience is what will decide whether cities or indeed countries, preserve their quality of life, economic wealth and, in some cases, their political integrity. The aim of this research is to provide a framework to describe best practices in urban resilience within Canada, which can then serve as a guide for those willing to develop such practices in their own cities. There are four objectives of this study: 1) a critical review of technologies that can be used to support resilience, including big data and advanced computing; 2) completion of a pilot study in Canada, which looks into the approaches to resilience in a developed country; 3) polling of three major cities in Canada to determine their best practices for building resilience; and 4) development of a guide to support resilience implementation measures. Two data collection methods were used, primary and secondary research. Secondary research was used to gather information from Canadian and foreign published academic literature. Primary research was performed with data collected from cities of Mississauga and Toronto, Ontario; Calgary, Alberta; and Vancouver, British Columbia. These primary data were analyzed using factor analysis, as the data collected were textual rather than numeric in nature. The main contribution of this research was the development of a framework for resilience containing five main features: cost, training, software, security and big data; with three components under each feature. The framework proposed can be used as the basis for the development of a toolkit for cities, which could help to evaluate how compliant cities are with implementing resilience measures.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.titleThe impact of emerging technologies in supporting urban resilience planning in Canadaen
dc.typeThesisen
All Items in WIRE are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.