Guideline references and academic citations as evidence of the clinical value of health research

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Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/614095
Title:
Guideline references and academic citations as evidence of the clinical value of health research
Authors:
Thelwall, Mike; Maflahi, Nabeil
Abstract:
This article introduces a new source of evidence of the value of medical-related research: citations from clinical guidelines. These give evidence that research findings have been used to inform the day-to-day practice of medical staff. To identify whether citations from guidelines can give different information from that of traditional citation counts, this article assesses the extent to which references in clinical guidelines tend to be highly cited in the academic literature and highly read in Mendeley. Using evidence from the United Kingdom, references associated with the UK's National Institute of Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) guidelines tended to be substantially more cited than comparable articles, unless they had been published in the most recent 3 years. Citation counts also seemed to be stronger indicators than Mendeley readership altmetrics. Hence, although presence in guidelines may be particularly useful to highlight the contributions of recently published articles, for older articles citation counts may already be sufficient to recognize their contributions to health in society.
Citation:
Guideline references and academic citations as evidence of the clinical value of health research 2016, 67 (4):960 Journal of the Association for Information Science and Technology
Journal:
Journal of the Association for Information Science and Technology
Issue Date:
Apr-2016
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/614095
DOI:
10.1002/asi.23432
Additional Links:
http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/asi.23432
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
23301635
Appears in Collections:
Statistical Cybermetrics Research Group

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorThelwall, Mikeen
dc.contributor.authorMaflahi, Nabeilen
dc.date.accessioned2016-06-22T14:22:36Zen
dc.date.available2016-06-22T14:22:36Zen
dc.date.issued2016-04en
dc.identifier.citationGuideline references and academic citations as evidence of the clinical value of health research 2016, 67 (4):960 Journal of the Association for Information Science and Technologyen
dc.identifier.issn23301635en
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/asi.23432en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/614095en
dc.description.abstractThis article introduces a new source of evidence of the value of medical-related research: citations from clinical guidelines. These give evidence that research findings have been used to inform the day-to-day practice of medical staff. To identify whether citations from guidelines can give different information from that of traditional citation counts, this article assesses the extent to which references in clinical guidelines tend to be highly cited in the academic literature and highly read in Mendeley. Using evidence from the United Kingdom, references associated with the UK's National Institute of Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) guidelines tended to be substantially more cited than comparable articles, unless they had been published in the most recent 3 years. Citation counts also seemed to be stronger indicators than Mendeley readership altmetrics. Hence, although presence in guidelines may be particularly useful to highlight the contributions of recently published articles, for older articles citation counts may already be sufficient to recognize their contributions to health in society.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.urlhttp://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/asi.23432en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Journal of the Association for Information Science and Technologyen
dc.subjectscientometricsen
dc.titleGuideline references and academic citations as evidence of the clinical value of health researchen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalJournal of the Association for Information Science and Technologyen
dc.contributor.institutionStatistical Cybermetrics Research Group; School of Mathematics and Computer Science; University of Wolverhampton; Wulfruna Street Wolverhampton WV1 1LY United Kingdomen
dc.contributor.institutionStatistical Cybermetrics Research Group; School of Mathematics and Computer Science; University of Wolverhampton; Wulfruna Street Wolverhampton WV1 1LY United Kingdomen
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