Failing securely: The processes and support which underpin English nurse mentors' assessment decisions regarding under-performing students

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/613840
Title:
Failing securely: The processes and support which underpin English nurse mentors' assessment decisions regarding under-performing students
Authors:
Hunt, Louise A.; McGee, Paula; Gutteridge, Robin; Hughes, Malcolm
Abstract:
Background: This studywas undertaken in response to concerns thatmentorswho assessed practical competence were reluctant to fail student nurses which generated doubts about the fitness to practise of some registered nurses. Limited evidence was available about the experiences of mentors who had failed underperforming students and what had helped them to do this. Aim: To investigate what enabled some mentors to fail underperforming students when it was recognised that many were hesitant to do so. Method: An ethically approved, grounded theory approachwas used to explore thirty-one nurses' experiences of failing student nurses in practical assessments in England. Participantswere recruited using theoretical sampling techniques. Semi-structured interviewswere conducted. Analysiswas undertaken using iterative, constant comparative techniques and reflexive processes. The theoretical framework which emerged had strong resonance with professionals. Findings: Five categories emerged fromthe findings: (1) Braving the assessment vortex; (2) Identifying the ‘gist’ of underperformance; (3) Tempering Reproach; (4) Standing up to scrutiny; and (5) Drawing on an interpersonal network. These categories together revealed that mentors needed to feel secure to fail a student nurse in a practical assessment and that they used a three stage decision making process to ascertain if this was the case. Many of the components which helped mentors to feel secure were informal in nature and functioned on goodwill and local arrangements rather than on timely, formal, organisational systems. The mentor's partner/spouse and practice education facilitator or link lecturer were identified as the key people who provided essential emotional support during this challenging experience. Conclusion: This study contributes to understanding of the combined supportive elements required for robust practical assessment. It presents a new explanatory framework about how mentors formulate the decision to fail a student nurse and the supportive structures which are necessary for this to occur.
Citation:
Failing securely: The processes and support which underpin English nurse mentors' assessment decisions regarding under-performing students 2016, 39:79 Nurse Education Today
Publisher:
Elsevier
Journal:
Nurse Education Today
Issue Date:
Apr-2016
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/613840
DOI:
10.1016/j.nedt.2016.01.011
Additional Links:
http://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0260691716000228
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
02606917
Appears in Collections:
FEHW

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorHunt, Louise A.en
dc.contributor.authorMcGee, Paulaen
dc.contributor.authorGutteridge, Robinen
dc.contributor.authorHughes, Malcolmen
dc.date.accessioned2016-06-21T09:05:13Zen
dc.date.available2016-06-21T09:05:13Zen
dc.date.issued2016-04en
dc.identifier.citationFailing securely: The processes and support which underpin English nurse mentors' assessment decisions regarding under-performing students 2016, 39:79 Nurse Education Todayen
dc.identifier.issn02606917en
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.nedt.2016.01.011en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/613840en
dc.description.abstractBackground: This studywas undertaken in response to concerns thatmentorswho assessed practical competence were reluctant to fail student nurses which generated doubts about the fitness to practise of some registered nurses. Limited evidence was available about the experiences of mentors who had failed underperforming students and what had helped them to do this. Aim: To investigate what enabled some mentors to fail underperforming students when it was recognised that many were hesitant to do so. Method: An ethically approved, grounded theory approachwas used to explore thirty-one nurses' experiences of failing student nurses in practical assessments in England. Participantswere recruited using theoretical sampling techniques. Semi-structured interviewswere conducted. Analysiswas undertaken using iterative, constant comparative techniques and reflexive processes. The theoretical framework which emerged had strong resonance with professionals. Findings: Five categories emerged fromthe findings: (1) Braving the assessment vortex; (2) Identifying the ‘gist’ of underperformance; (3) Tempering Reproach; (4) Standing up to scrutiny; and (5) Drawing on an interpersonal network. These categories together revealed that mentors needed to feel secure to fail a student nurse in a practical assessment and that they used a three stage decision making process to ascertain if this was the case. Many of the components which helped mentors to feel secure were informal in nature and functioned on goodwill and local arrangements rather than on timely, formal, organisational systems. The mentor's partner/spouse and practice education facilitator or link lecturer were identified as the key people who provided essential emotional support during this challenging experience. Conclusion: This study contributes to understanding of the combined supportive elements required for robust practical assessment. It presents a new explanatory framework about how mentors formulate the decision to fail a student nurse and the supportive structures which are necessary for this to occur.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherElsevieren
dc.relation.urlhttp://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0260691716000228en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Nurse Education Todayen
dc.subjectPractical assessmenten
dc.subjectFailing studentsen
dc.subjectClinical competenceen
dc.subjectMentoren
dc.titleFailing securely: The processes and support which underpin English nurse mentors' assessment decisions regarding under-performing studentsen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalNurse Education Todayen
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