2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/612735
Title:
Mechanical and physical properties of concrete containing FGD waste
Authors:
Khatib, Jamal M.; Mangat, Pal S.; Wright, Lee
Abstract:
The work reported here forms part of a wide-ranging research project on the optimum use of waste from dry and semi-dry flue gas desulfurisation (FGD) processes in concrete. This study examined the influence of a typical simulated desulfurised waste (SDW) on the physical and mechanical and physical properties of concrete. SDW was chosen due to the wide variability in the composition of actual FGD waste. Two binder systems were investigated: cement and SDW (C-SDW) and cement, slag and SDW (C-S-SDW). The SDW content ranged from 0 to 70% and the slag from 0 to 90% as partial cement replacements. The properties examined included compressive and flexural strengths, water absorption, shrinkage and expansion. The results showed that replacing cement with SDW beyond 20% systematically reduces strength. An increase in SDW content reduces shrinkage. The presence of small amounts of slag allows the use of high proportions of SDW. The use of desulfurised waste in concrete applications is possible as adequate strength can be achieved.
Citation:
Mechanical and physical properties of concrete containing FGD waste 2016, 68 (11):550 Magazine of Concrete Research
Publisher:
ICE Publishing
Journal:
Magazine of Concrete Research
Issue Date:
Jun-2016
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/612735
DOI:
10.1680/macr.15.00092
Additional Links:
http://www.icevirtuallibrary.com/doi/10.1680/macr.15.00092
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
0024-9831
Sponsors:
European Commission (Inco Copernicus)
Appears in Collections:
Construction and Infrastructure

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorKhatib, Jamal M.en
dc.contributor.authorMangat, Pal S.en
dc.contributor.authorWright, Leeen
dc.date.accessioned2016-06-13T10:00:26Zen
dc.date.available2016-06-13T10:00:26Zen
dc.date.issued2016-06en
dc.identifier.citationMechanical and physical properties of concrete containing FGD waste 2016, 68 (11):550 Magazine of Concrete Researchen
dc.identifier.issn0024-9831en
dc.identifier.doi10.1680/macr.15.00092en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/612735en
dc.description.abstractThe work reported here forms part of a wide-ranging research project on the optimum use of waste from dry and semi-dry flue gas desulfurisation (FGD) processes in concrete. This study examined the influence of a typical simulated desulfurised waste (SDW) on the physical and mechanical and physical properties of concrete. SDW was chosen due to the wide variability in the composition of actual FGD waste. Two binder systems were investigated: cement and SDW (C-SDW) and cement, slag and SDW (C-S-SDW). The SDW content ranged from 0 to 70% and the slag from 0 to 90% as partial cement replacements. The properties examined included compressive and flexural strengths, water absorption, shrinkage and expansion. The results showed that replacing cement with SDW beyond 20% systematically reduces strength. An increase in SDW content reduces shrinkage. The presence of small amounts of slag allows the use of high proportions of SDW. The use of desulfurised waste in concrete applications is possible as adequate strength can be achieved.en
dc.description.sponsorshipEuropean Commission (Inco Copernicus)en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherICE Publishingen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.icevirtuallibrary.com/doi/10.1680/macr.15.00092en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Magazine of Concrete Researchen
dc.subjectconcrete technology & manufactureen
dc.subjectrecycling & reuse of materialsen
dc.subjectenvironmenten
dc.titleMechanical and physical properties of concrete containing FGD wasteen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalMagazine of Concrete Researchen
dc.date.accepted2016-06-01en
rioxxterms.funderEuropean Commission (Inco Copernicus)en
rioxxterms.identifier.projectERBIC 15 CT 960741en
rioxxterms.versionAMen
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttps://creativecommons.org/CC BY-NC-ND 4.0en
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2016-06-13en
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