2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/6120
Title:
Developing the information skills agenda
Authors:
Ordidge, Irene
Abstract:
Technological advances by the database creators of the late 60’s and early 70’s enabled the ‘information explosion’ to be managed and accessed. Information professionals developed specialist skills to explore these bibliographic resources on-line. A decade later, as attitudes changed and resources became more accessible, a parallel agenda of user education programmes was being developed by librarians. The information skills agenda took shape across schools, colleges and Higher Education institutions and a skills hand-over began. The curriculum focussed on access to print resources initially to support the shift to resource-based and flexible learning initiatives. The rapid developments in desktop information technology in the late 80’s and 90’s brought the two developments closer together. It enabled information professionals, already supporting the development of user information skills, to include access to bibliographic databases and electronic resources on CD-ROM and on-line.
Citation:
CELT Learning and Teaching Projects 2000/2001
Publisher:
University of Wolverhampton
Issue Date:
2001
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/6120
Additional Links:
http://www.wlv.ac.uk/celt
Submitted date:
2006
Type:
Book chapter
Language:
en
Description:
CELT Projects on Changing Practice Through Innovation and Research
ISBN:
095421160X
Appears in Collections:
Institute for Learning Enhancement (ILE); Staff Papers

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorOrdidge, Irene-
dc.date.accessioned2006-11-16T14:47:17Z-
dc.date.available2006-11-16T14:47:17Z-
dc.date.issued2001-
dc.date.submitted2006-
dc.identifier.citationCELT Learning and Teaching Projects 2000/2001en
dc.identifier.isbn095421160X-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/6120-
dc.descriptionCELT Projects on Changing Practice Through Innovation and Researchen
dc.description.abstractTechnological advances by the database creators of the late 60’s and early 70’s enabled the ‘information explosion’ to be managed and accessed. Information professionals developed specialist skills to explore these bibliographic resources on-line. A decade later, as attitudes changed and resources became more accessible, a parallel agenda of user education programmes was being developed by librarians. The information skills agenda took shape across schools, colleges and Higher Education institutions and a skills hand-over began. The curriculum focussed on access to print resources initially to support the shift to resource-based and flexible learning initiatives. The rapid developments in desktop information technology in the late 80’s and 90’s brought the two developments closer together. It enabled information professionals, already supporting the development of user information skills, to include access to bibliographic databases and electronic resources on CD-ROM and on-line.en
dc.format.extent110072 bytes-
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf-
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherUniversity of Wolverhamptonen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.wlv.ac.uk/celten
dc.subjectUniversity of Wolverhamptonen
dc.subjectInformation skillsen
dc.subjectWOLFen
dc.subjectLearning technologyen
dc.subjectLibrary research skillsen
dc.subjectInformation literacyen
dc.titleDeveloping the information skills agendaen
dc.typeBook chapteren
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