Balancing safety and enjoyment. Current practice when recommending tastes for people with intellectual disabilities who are non-orally fed.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/611526
Title:
Balancing safety and enjoyment. Current practice when recommending tastes for people with intellectual disabilities who are non-orally fed.
Authors:
Chadwick, Darren ( 0000-0002-4963-0973 )
Abstract:
Eating and drinking problems are common among people with intellectual disabilities. Having a compromised swallow or being at risk of inadequate nutrition are two reasons for introducing non-oral feeding. Such procedures involve the creation of an external opening for food and drink to be delivered directly into the stomach through a tube. In recent years maintenance of the swallow and quality of life issues have led to introduction of small amounts of food and drink (oral tastes) for people who are non-orally fed. Little evidence exists about the reasoning used to inform this decision or the types of oral tastes offered. This study aims to address these omissions. An exploratory survey, distributed via email, was used to gather information from speech and language therapists and dietitians about their current practice and their decision-making processes when offering oral tastes to people who are non-orally fed. Data presented here reflect the responses from respondents working primarily with people with intellectual disabilities (55 out of 158 respondents). Oral tastes were being offered and clinical decision-making around this centred on balancing the wellbeing and wishes of the person with intellectual disabilities and their carers with the risks to wellbeing inherent in implementing and supporting an oral taste programme.
Citation:
Balancing safety and enjoyment. Current practice when recommending tastes for people with intellectual disabilities who are non-orally fed. 2014, 81:152-61 Appetite
Publisher:
Elsevier
Journal:
Appetite, Volume 81, 1 October 2014, Pages 152–161
Issue Date:
Oct-2014
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/611526
DOI:
10.1016/j.appet.2014.06.016
PubMed ID:
24933684
Additional Links:
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.appet.2014.06.016
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
1095-8304
Appears in Collections:
Psychology

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorChadwick, Darrenen
dc.date.accessioned2016-06-02T09:24:45Zen
dc.date.available2016-06-02T09:24:45Zen
dc.date.issued2014-10en
dc.identifier.citationBalancing safety and enjoyment. Current practice when recommending tastes for people with intellectual disabilities who are non-orally fed. 2014, 81:152-61 Appetiteen
dc.identifier.issn1095-8304en
dc.identifier.pmid24933684en
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.appet.2014.06.016en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/611526en
dc.description.abstractEating and drinking problems are common among people with intellectual disabilities. Having a compromised swallow or being at risk of inadequate nutrition are two reasons for introducing non-oral feeding. Such procedures involve the creation of an external opening for food and drink to be delivered directly into the stomach through a tube. In recent years maintenance of the swallow and quality of life issues have led to introduction of small amounts of food and drink (oral tastes) for people who are non-orally fed. Little evidence exists about the reasoning used to inform this decision or the types of oral tastes offered. This study aims to address these omissions. An exploratory survey, distributed via email, was used to gather information from speech and language therapists and dietitians about their current practice and their decision-making processes when offering oral tastes to people who are non-orally fed. Data presented here reflect the responses from respondents working primarily with people with intellectual disabilities (55 out of 158 respondents). Oral tastes were being offered and clinical decision-making around this centred on balancing the wellbeing and wishes of the person with intellectual disabilities and their carers with the risks to wellbeing inherent in implementing and supporting an oral taste programme.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherElsevieren
dc.relation.urlhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.appet.2014.06.016en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Appetiteen
dc.subjectEnteral nutritionen
dc.subjectDysphagiaen
dc.subjectIntellectual disabilitiesen
dc.subjectSpeech and language therapyen
dc.subjectDecision makingen
dc.subject.meshDecision Makingen
dc.subject.meshEatingen
dc.subject.meshFeeding Behavioren
dc.subject.meshFeeding Methodsen
dc.subject.meshFollow-Up Studiesen
dc.subject.meshHealth Surveysen
dc.subject.meshHumansen
dc.subject.meshMentally Disabled Personsen
dc.subject.meshNutritionistsen
dc.subject.meshPilot Projectsen
dc.subject.meshPleasureen
dc.subject.meshQualitative Researchen
dc.subject.meshQuality of Lifeen
dc.subject.meshRisk Assessmenten
dc.subject.meshTasteen
dc.titleBalancing safety and enjoyment. Current practice when recommending tastes for people with intellectual disabilities who are non-orally fed.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalAppetite, Volume 81, 1 October 2014, Pages 152–161en

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