Adult education, social transformation and the pursuit of social justice

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/611265
Title:
Adult education, social transformation and the pursuit of social justice
Authors:
Tuckett, Alan ( 0000-0001-7475-4727 )
Abstract:
At first sight, adult education lacks capacity to contribute significantly to social transformation for social justice. Except perhaps in the Nordic countries, adult education sits, overwhelmingly, at the margins of public educational systems with limited budgets, modest levels of professional staffing, and, at best, variable facilities. The 2015 Education For All Global Monitoring Report (GMR) reports that ‘adult education in high income countries appears to have mostly served those who completed secondary education rather than adults who lack basic skills’ (UNESCO, 2015, p. 109; OECD, 2013). It states that, after 25 years of global targets giving priority to reducing illiteracy, 781 million adults still lack literacy, and, of them, 64% are women, a percentage that has remained unchanged since 1990; and that ethnic and linguistic minorities, disabled adults, rural and indigenous communities benefit little from programmes. It also finds that such literacy gain as there has been in most countries can be explained by cohort change – better-schooled young people displacing less-skilled older adults in the population (UNESCO, 2015). To borrow a memorable phrase of Helena Kennedy, it seems that ‘If at first you don’t succeed, you don’t succeed’ (FEFC, 1997).
Publisher:
John Wiley & Sons
Journal:
European Journal of Education vol.50 no.3
Issue Date:
Sep-2015
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/611265
Additional Links:
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1111/(ISSN)1465-3435
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
1465-3435
Appears in Collections:
FEHW

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorTuckett, Alanen
dc.date.accessioned2016-05-31T14:45:53Zen
dc.date.available2016-05-31T14:45:53Zen
dc.date.issued2015-09en
dc.identifier.issn1465-3435en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/611265en
dc.description.abstractAt first sight, adult education lacks capacity to contribute significantly to social transformation for social justice. Except perhaps in the Nordic countries, adult education sits, overwhelmingly, at the margins of public educational systems with limited budgets, modest levels of professional staffing, and, at best, variable facilities. The 2015 Education For All Global Monitoring Report (GMR) reports that ‘adult education in high income countries appears to have mostly served those who completed secondary education rather than adults who lack basic skills’ (UNESCO, 2015, p. 109; OECD, 2013). It states that, after 25 years of global targets giving priority to reducing illiteracy, 781 million adults still lack literacy, and, of them, 64% are women, a percentage that has remained unchanged since 1990; and that ethnic and linguistic minorities, disabled adults, rural and indigenous communities benefit little from programmes. It also finds that such literacy gain as there has been in most countries can be explained by cohort change – better-schooled young people displacing less-skilled older adults in the population (UNESCO, 2015). To borrow a memorable phrase of Helena Kennedy, it seems that ‘If at first you don’t succeed, you don’t succeed’ (FEFC, 1997).en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherJohn Wiley & Sonsen
dc.relation.urlhttp://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1111/(ISSN)1465-3435en
dc.subjectadult learningen
dc.subjectsocial justiceen
dc.subjectinequalityen
dc.subjectAgencyen
dc.titleAdult education, social transformation and the pursuit of social justiceen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalEuropean Journal of Education vol.50 no.3en
All Items in WIRE are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.