The International Council for Adult Education and Adult Learning Policy: Addressing the Gap between Rhetoric and Practice

5.00
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/611239
Title:
The International Council for Adult Education and Adult Learning Policy: Addressing the Gap between Rhetoric and Practice
Authors:
Tuckett, Alan
Abstract:
The first decade of the twenty-first century began with high hopes for improved opportunities for adult learners. In 1996 a UNESCO committee produced Learning: The Treasure Within (Delors, 1996), and in the same year the finance ministers of OECD countries agreed to give new impetus to lifelong learning policies since human capital was of central importance to the prosperity of industrialized economies (OECD, 1996; Rubenson, 2009; Schuller, 2009). These initiatives were followed by two key global events at which governments signed agreements to improve opportunities for the education of adults. CONFINTEA V, which was held in Hamburg in 1997, had established a broad developmental agenda for adult education (Nesbit and Welton, 2013) which recognized its distinctive role, both as a key part of the structured educational system and as a catalyst in achieving improvements to health and wellbeing, in industrial development, and in securing vibrant democracies through their active and engaged citizens (UNESCO, 1997). In 2000 the education agenda that had been agreed a decade earlier at Jomtien, Thailand, was reviewed and strengthened at the World Education Forum (UNESCO, 2000), which was held in Dakar, Senegal. Six global goals were agreed upon, including halving the rate of illiteracy by 2015; securing gender equality in access to education for girls and women; and, more vaguely, meeting the learning needs of all young people and adults through equitable access to appropriate learning and life-skills programmes (UNESCO, 2000).
Citation:
In: Tom Nesbit & Marcella Milana (eds), Global Perspectives on Adult Learning and Policy, 221-236
Publisher:
Palgrave Macmillan
Issue Date:
2015
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/611239
Type:
Book chapter
Language:
en
ISBN:
9781137388254
Appears in Collections:
Professional and Adult Learning

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorTuckett, Alanen
dc.date.accessioned2016-05-31T13:59:47Zen
dc.date.available2016-05-31T13:59:47Zen
dc.date.issued2015en
dc.identifier.citationIn: Tom Nesbit & Marcella Milana (eds), Global Perspectives on Adult Learning and Policy, 221-236en
dc.identifier.isbn9781137388254en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/611239en
dc.description.abstractThe first decade of the twenty-first century began with high hopes for improved opportunities for adult learners. In 1996 a UNESCO committee produced Learning: The Treasure Within (Delors, 1996), and in the same year the finance ministers of OECD countries agreed to give new impetus to lifelong learning policies since human capital was of central importance to the prosperity of industrialized economies (OECD, 1996; Rubenson, 2009; Schuller, 2009). These initiatives were followed by two key global events at which governments signed agreements to improve opportunities for the education of adults. CONFINTEA V, which was held in Hamburg in 1997, had established a broad developmental agenda for adult education (Nesbit and Welton, 2013) which recognized its distinctive role, both as a key part of the structured educational system and as a catalyst in achieving improvements to health and wellbeing, in industrial development, and in securing vibrant democracies through their active and engaged citizens (UNESCO, 1997). In 2000 the education agenda that had been agreed a decade earlier at Jomtien, Thailand, was reviewed and strengthened at the World Education Forum (UNESCO, 2000), which was held in Dakar, Senegal. Six global goals were agreed upon, including halving the rate of illiteracy by 2015; securing gender equality in access to education for girls and women; and, more vaguely, meeting the learning needs of all young people and adults through equitable access to appropriate learning and life-skills programmes (UNESCO, 2000).en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherPalgrave Macmillanen
dc.subjectCivil societyen
dc.subjectadvocacyen
dc.subjectadult learningen
dc.subjectSustainableen
dc.subjectEducation Goalsen
dc.titleThe International Council for Adult Education and Adult Learning Policy: Addressing the Gap between Rhetoric and Practiceen
dc.typeBook chapteren
dc.identifier.orcid0000-0001-7475-4727en
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