Anti-Castism and Misplaced Nativism: Mapping caste as an aspect of race

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/609620
Title:
Anti-Castism and Misplaced Nativism: Mapping caste as an aspect of race
Authors:
Dhanda, Meena
Abstract:
From September 2013 to February 2014 I led a project on ‘Caste in Britain’ for the UK Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC). [*] It culminated in two research reports. [1] The remit of the project was, first, to review existing socio-legal research on British equality law and caste, and, second, to conduct two supporting events with the aim of bringing together interdisciplinary expertise and a range of stakeholder views on caste, and discrimination on the basis of caste, in the UK. In April 2013, MPs and peers had voted in both Houses of Parliament to enact the Enterprise and Regulatory Reform Bill, Section 97 of which requires government to introduce a statutory prohibition of caste discrimination into British equality law by making caste an aspect of the protected characteristic of race in the Equality Act 2010 (EA 2010). [2] Following direction by the government, the EHRC contracted a team of academics from different universities, led by me, to carry out an independent study on caste in Britain. We set out to identify concerns and common ground in relation to the implementation of the statuary prohibition on caste discrimination in advance of and in anticipation of the required secondary legislation that will make caste ‘an aspect of race’ in the EA 2010.
Publisher:
NA
Journal:
Radical Philosophy
Issue Date:
Jul-2015
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/609620
Additional Links:
https://www.radicalphilosophy.com/issues/192
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Description:
The article is a revised version of the Keynote address at the Society for Women in philosophy UK annual conference at University of Essex, which was funded by SWIP UK.
ISSN:
0300-211X)
Appears in Collections:
CTTR

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorDhanda, Meenaen
dc.date.accessioned2016-05-18T13:17:16Zen
dc.date.available2016-05-18T13:17:16Zen
dc.date.issued2015-07en
dc.identifier.issn0300-211X)en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/609620en
dc.descriptionThe article is a revised version of the Keynote address at the Society for Women in philosophy UK annual conference at University of Essex, which was funded by SWIP UK.en
dc.description.abstractFrom September 2013 to February 2014 I led a project on ‘Caste in Britain’ for the UK Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC). [*] It culminated in two research reports. [1] The remit of the project was, first, to review existing socio-legal research on British equality law and caste, and, second, to conduct two supporting events with the aim of bringing together interdisciplinary expertise and a range of stakeholder views on caste, and discrimination on the basis of caste, in the UK. In April 2013, MPs and peers had voted in both Houses of Parliament to enact the Enterprise and Regulatory Reform Bill, Section 97 of which requires government to introduce a statutory prohibition of caste discrimination into British equality law by making caste an aspect of the protected characteristic of race in the Equality Act 2010 (EA 2010). [2] Following direction by the government, the EHRC contracted a team of academics from different universities, led by me, to carry out an independent study on caste in Britain. We set out to identify concerns and common ground in relation to the implementation of the statuary prohibition on caste discrimination in advance of and in anticipation of the required secondary legislation that will make caste ‘an aspect of race’ in the EA 2010.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherNAen
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.radicalphilosophy.com/issues/192en
dc.subjectCasteen
dc.subjectRaceen
dc.subjectphenomenology of casteen
dc.subjectanti-castismen
dc.subjectanti-racismen
dc.subjectnativismen
dc.subjectOrientalismen
dc.subjectDaliten
dc.subjectAmbedkaren
dc.subjectGandhien
dc.subjectEquality Act 2010en
dc.subjectdiscriminationen
dc.titleAnti-Castism and Misplaced Nativism: Mapping caste as an aspect of raceen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalRadical Philosophyen
All Items in WIRE are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.