Hybridity, Identities and Inclusion of International PhD Students in England

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/608461
Title:
Hybridity, Identities and Inclusion of International PhD Students in England
Authors:
Tsouroufli, Maria
Abstract:
This paper draws on a qualitative interview study, which aimed to explore how international PhD students make sense of their experiences of studying in a Russell group University and living in England. Hybridity was narrated as contextual and relational identity performance in response to encounters with difference and was imbued with emotions of loss, confusion, tension and disappointment. Hybridity encompassed a range of identity positions including shifting old identities, blending local and global identities, and re-defining old identities. These positions intersected with students’ constructions and performances of gender, religion, culture, nationality and community and were shaped by international PhD students’ attempts to interact with home students, staff and the wider community, and feel included. Although international students’ attempts to create social capital and negotiate hybrid identities took place within unequal relations of power, they demonstrated intentionality, agency and diversity. Further research is required to critique the homogenisation of international students and unravel multiple inequalities in higher education, which continue to constrain the participation of many groups of students despite popular discourses of internationalization and widening participation.
Publisher:
The Department of Business Management, Heriot Watt University HWU and published by SML
Journal:
Interdisciplinary Perspectives in Equality and Diversity, Vol 1, No 1 (2015)
Issue Date:
2015
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/608461
Additional Links:
http://journals.hw.ac.uk/index.php/IPED/article/view/11
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
2396-8532
Sponsors:
University of York
Appears in Collections:
FEHW

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorTsouroufli, Mariaen
dc.date.accessioned2016-05-06T08:53:10Zen
dc.date.available2016-05-06T08:53:10Zen
dc.date.issued2015en
dc.identifier.issn2396-8532en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/608461en
dc.description.abstractThis paper draws on a qualitative interview study, which aimed to explore how international PhD students make sense of their experiences of studying in a Russell group University and living in England. Hybridity was narrated as contextual and relational identity performance in response to encounters with difference and was imbued with emotions of loss, confusion, tension and disappointment. Hybridity encompassed a range of identity positions including shifting old identities, blending local and global identities, and re-defining old identities. These positions intersected with students’ constructions and performances of gender, religion, culture, nationality and community and were shaped by international PhD students’ attempts to interact with home students, staff and the wider community, and feel included. Although international students’ attempts to create social capital and negotiate hybrid identities took place within unequal relations of power, they demonstrated intentionality, agency and diversity. Further research is required to critique the homogenisation of international students and unravel multiple inequalities in higher education, which continue to constrain the participation of many groups of students despite popular discourses of internationalization and widening participation.en
dc.description.sponsorshipUniversity of Yorken
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherThe Department of Business Management, Heriot Watt University HWU and published by SMLen
dc.relation.urlhttp://journals.hw.ac.uk/index.php/IPED/article/view/11en
dc.subjectidentitiesen
dc.subjecthybridityen
dc.subjectinternationalen
dc.subjectPhD studentsen
dc.subjectinclusionen
dc.subjectEnglanden
dc.titleHybridity, Identities and Inclusion of International PhD Students in Englanden
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalInterdisciplinary Perspectives in Equality and Diversity, Vol 1, No 1 (2015)en
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