2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/607234
Title:
A Bibliographic Review of Medicine and Science Research in DanceSport
Authors:
Wyon, Matthew ( 0000-0003-0942-2333 ) ; Riding-McCabe, T; Ambegaonkar, J; Redding, E
Abstract:
DanceSport is the competitive form of ballroom dancing, and even though it has more participants worldwide than ballet and modern dance, there is less peer-reviewed research. A review was conducted to identify all relevant literature to help researchers and clinicians gain an enhanced understanding of dancesport. Eight databases were searched, with 34 articles found in topics including participation motives, psychology, exercise physiology, fitness training, injuries and injury prevention, biomechanics, menstrual dysfunction, and substance use. Our results indicate that researchers have been inconsistently recording and reporting anthropometric and dancesport data; for example, 31 studies separated participants by gender, 21 included the competition classification of dancers, 19 reported which style of dancesport participants competed in, and 13 described the participants as a dance couple. Common injuries affected the neck, shoulder, spine, knee, lower leg, and foot. Dancesport is in the very heavy to extremely heavy category in energy expenditure (mean heart rate: male 175.2 ± 10.7, female 178.6 ± 8.6 bpm) and utilizes both aerobic and anaerobic energy systems. Alpha-beta and heart rate variability intervention techniques are reported to successfully enhance performance in dancers. Dancesport participants also appear less likely to smoke cigarettes, but have little knowledge about anti-doping rules. During events, professionals danced farther (30 m) and faster (0.3 m/sec) than junior dancers. Female competitors were more likely to be eumenorrheic. Dancesport is a physically and mentally demanding competitive sport, but there is a need to standardize measurements in future studies to allow comparison.
Publisher:
Science & Medicine
Journal:
Medical Problems in Performing Artists, Volume 28, Number 2 June 2013, p70
Issue Date:
Jun-2013
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/607234
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
0885-1158
Appears in Collections:
Dance Science

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorWyon, Matthewen
dc.contributor.authorRiding-McCabe, Ten
dc.contributor.authorAmbegaonkar, Jen
dc.contributor.authorRedding, Een
dc.date.accessioned2016-04-27T13:42:16Zen
dc.date.available2016-04-27T13:42:16Zen
dc.date.issued2013-06en
dc.identifier.issn0885-1158en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/607234en
dc.description.abstractDanceSport is the competitive form of ballroom dancing, and even though it has more participants worldwide than ballet and modern dance, there is less peer-reviewed research. A review was conducted to identify all relevant literature to help researchers and clinicians gain an enhanced understanding of dancesport. Eight databases were searched, with 34 articles found in topics including participation motives, psychology, exercise physiology, fitness training, injuries and injury prevention, biomechanics, menstrual dysfunction, and substance use. Our results indicate that researchers have been inconsistently recording and reporting anthropometric and dancesport data; for example, 31 studies separated participants by gender, 21 included the competition classification of dancers, 19 reported which style of dancesport participants competed in, and 13 described the participants as a dance couple. Common injuries affected the neck, shoulder, spine, knee, lower leg, and foot. Dancesport is in the very heavy to extremely heavy category in energy expenditure (mean heart rate: male 175.2 ± 10.7, female 178.6 ± 8.6 bpm) and utilizes both aerobic and anaerobic energy systems. Alpha-beta and heart rate variability intervention techniques are reported to successfully enhance performance in dancers. Dancesport participants also appear less likely to smoke cigarettes, but have little knowledge about anti-doping rules. During events, professionals danced farther (30 m) and faster (0.3 m/sec) than junior dancers. Female competitors were more likely to be eumenorrheic. Dancesport is a physically and mentally demanding competitive sport, but there is a need to standardize measurements in future studies to allow comparison.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherScience & Medicineen
dc.subjectMedicineen
dc.subjectScienceen
dc.subjectDanceSporten
dc.subjectinjuryen
dc.titleA Bibliographic Review of Medicine and Science Research in DanceSporten
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalMedical Problems in Performing Artists, Volume 28, Number 2 June 2013, p70en
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