The influence of occupational socialisation upon the teaching of pupils experiencing social and emotional behavioural difficulties (SEBD) in physical education

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/606612
Title:
The influence of occupational socialisation upon the teaching of pupils experiencing social and emotional behavioural difficulties (SEBD) in physical education
Authors:
O'Leary, Nick; Longmore, Carl; Medcalf, Richard
Abstract:
Research within physical education (PE) utilising the occupational socialisation framework indicates that the childhood phase of socialisation is the most powerful phase of socialisation. However, for most teachers working with pupils experiencing special educational needs (SEN), the childhood phase often lacks direct experience of SEN and thus ceases to exist as a socialising force. Consequently, the higher education and workplace phases form a ‘salvaged’ phase upon which to base pedagogical approaches (Pugach). In light of this dichotomy, the aims of this case study were to (1) examine how one PE head of department (HOD) in a specialist social and emotional behavioural difficulties (SEBD) school taught year 9 pupils games; (2) identify factors that led to such instruction and (3) consider the influence of the three phases of occupational socialisation on her pedagogical approaches. Data collection methods consisted of formal and informal interviews and lesson observations. The data were inductively analysed, and themes were drawn from this process. Using a systematic learning approach, lessons were game orientated based around pupil decision-making and limited technical practice. Factors influencing this practice were her exploratory outdoor activity experiences and the nature of the pupils. In contrast to Pugach, this research indicates that the childhood phase of socialisation can provide an ‘apprenticeship of observation’ for those teaching PE to pupils experiencing SEBD. That such perceptions can be strongly held suggests that prior examination of the childhood biographies of those recruited to PE teacher training and/or PE teachers teaching pupils who experience SEBD appears warranted.
Citation:
The influence of occupational socialisation upon the teaching of pupils experiencing social and emotional behavioural difficulties (SEBD) in physical education 2015, 15 (4):247 Journal of Research in Special Educational Needs
Publisher:
NASEN
Journal:
Journal of Research in Special Educational Needs, Volume 15 Number 4 2015 247–256
Issue Date:
Oct-2015
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/606612
DOI:
10.1111/1471-3802.12033
Additional Links:
http://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/1471-3802.12033
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
14713802
Appears in Collections:
FEHW

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorO'Leary, Nicken
dc.contributor.authorLongmore, Carlen
dc.contributor.authorMedcalf, Richarden
dc.date.accessioned2016-04-22T14:53:17Zen
dc.date.available2016-04-22T14:53:17Zen
dc.date.issued2015-10en
dc.identifier.citationThe influence of occupational socialisation upon the teaching of pupils experiencing social and emotional behavioural difficulties (SEBD) in physical education 2015, 15 (4):247 Journal of Research in Special Educational Needsen
dc.identifier.issn14713802en
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/1471-3802.12033en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/606612en
dc.description.abstractResearch within physical education (PE) utilising the occupational socialisation framework indicates that the childhood phase of socialisation is the most powerful phase of socialisation. However, for most teachers working with pupils experiencing special educational needs (SEN), the childhood phase often lacks direct experience of SEN and thus ceases to exist as a socialising force. Consequently, the higher education and workplace phases form a ‘salvaged’ phase upon which to base pedagogical approaches (Pugach). In light of this dichotomy, the aims of this case study were to (1) examine how one PE head of department (HOD) in a specialist social and emotional behavioural difficulties (SEBD) school taught year 9 pupils games; (2) identify factors that led to such instruction and (3) consider the influence of the three phases of occupational socialisation on her pedagogical approaches. Data collection methods consisted of formal and informal interviews and lesson observations. The data were inductively analysed, and themes were drawn from this process. Using a systematic learning approach, lessons were game orientated based around pupil decision-making and limited technical practice. Factors influencing this practice were her exploratory outdoor activity experiences and the nature of the pupils. In contrast to Pugach, this research indicates that the childhood phase of socialisation can provide an ‘apprenticeship of observation’ for those teaching PE to pupils experiencing SEBD. That such perceptions can be strongly held suggests that prior examination of the childhood biographies of those recruited to PE teacher training and/or PE teachers teaching pupils who experience SEBD appears warranted.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherNASENen
dc.relation.urlhttp://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/1471-3802.12033en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Journal of Research in Special Educational Needsen
dc.subjectSocial and emotional behavioural difficultiesen
dc.subjectoccupational socialisationen
dc.subjectphysical education.en
dc.titleThe influence of occupational socialisation upon the teaching of pupils experiencing social and emotional behavioural difficulties (SEBD) in physical educationen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Research in Special Educational Needs, Volume 15 Number 4 2015 247–256en
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of Wolverhamptonen
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of Wolverhamptonen
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of Wolverhamptonen
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