2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/605195
Title:
Sikhi(sm) and the Twenty-FirstCentury Sikh Diaspora
Authors:
Takhar, Opinderjit Kaur ( 0000-0002-0190-4541 )
Abstract:
Although the youngest of the six major world faiths, Sikhism currently has the fifth largest global following. This chapter will aim to address what makes the Sikh faith or Sikh way of life a sensible faith for millions of adherents and the extent to which Sikhi(sm) has adapted, and indeed whether adaptation is necessary, in terms of rationality and reason in the twenty-first century. Currently, there is debate amongst Sikhs whether the suffix ‘ism’ should be added to any references to their faith. Sikhs tend to show preference for the term ‘Sikhi’ which they believe is reflective of the teachings of the Sikh Gurus. Sikhs on the whole view their faith as a way of life rather than a pronounced dogma. Many also view the suffix ‘ism’ as a colonial invention of boxing customs and traditions together in a homogeneous category. I will explore the ways in which the central tenets of the Sikh way of life enable religious people to live Sikhi through their ordinary lives. The challenges pertaining to the transmission of Sikhi to British-born Sikhs will be addressed in the light of discussing the sensibility of Sikhi in the twenty-first century. Hence this is an attempt in providing criteria, or a ‘litmus test’, by which to assess the attractiveness of Sikhi to its millions of followers, with particular reference to the British Sikh diaspora. Christopher Lewis, earlier in this volume, has discussed the connotations of the term ‘sensible’ which extends also to an exploration of what the terms ‘good’ and ‘bad’ religion may entail. This will provide a framework for my analysis into the sensibility of Sikhi.
Citation:
In: Christopher Lewis, Dan Cohn-Sherbok, Sensible Religion: Chapter 13
Publisher:
Ashgate Publishing
Issue Date:
Aug-2014
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/605195
Additional Links:
https://www.routledge.com/products/9781409468080
Type:
Book chapter
Language:
en
ISBN:
9781409468080
Appears in Collections:
CTTR

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorTakhar, Opinderjit Kauren
dc.date.accessioned2016-04-13T14:46:41Zen
dc.date.available2016-04-13T14:46:41Zen
dc.date.issued2014-08en
dc.identifier.citationIn: Christopher Lewis, Dan Cohn-Sherbok, Sensible Religion: Chapter 13en
dc.identifier.isbn9781409468080en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/605195en
dc.description.abstractAlthough the youngest of the six major world faiths, Sikhism currently has the fifth largest global following. This chapter will aim to address what makes the Sikh faith or Sikh way of life a sensible faith for millions of adherents and the extent to which Sikhi(sm) has adapted, and indeed whether adaptation is necessary, in terms of rationality and reason in the twenty-first century. Currently, there is debate amongst Sikhs whether the suffix ‘ism’ should be added to any references to their faith. Sikhs tend to show preference for the term ‘Sikhi’ which they believe is reflective of the teachings of the Sikh Gurus. Sikhs on the whole view their faith as a way of life rather than a pronounced dogma. Many also view the suffix ‘ism’ as a colonial invention of boxing customs and traditions together in a homogeneous category. I will explore the ways in which the central tenets of the Sikh way of life enable religious people to live Sikhi through their ordinary lives. The challenges pertaining to the transmission of Sikhi to British-born Sikhs will be addressed in the light of discussing the sensibility of Sikhi in the twenty-first century. Hence this is an attempt in providing criteria, or a ‘litmus test’, by which to assess the attractiveness of Sikhi to its millions of followers, with particular reference to the British Sikh diaspora. Christopher Lewis, earlier in this volume, has discussed the connotations of the term ‘sensible’ which extends also to an exploration of what the terms ‘good’ and ‘bad’ religion may entail. This will provide a framework for my analysis into the sensibility of Sikhi.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherAshgate Publishingen
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.routledge.com/products/9781409468080en
dc.subjectSikhien
dc.subjectSikh practiceen
dc.subjectGianisen
dc.subjectGurdwarasen
dc.subjectPoliticsen
dc.subjectMiri Pirien
dc.titleSikhi(sm) and the Twenty-FirstCentury Sikh Diasporaen
dc.typeBook chapteren
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