From ‘shallow’ to ‘deep’ policing: ‘crash-for-cash’ insurance fraud investigation in England and Wales and the need for greater regulation

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/604850
Title:
From ‘shallow’ to ‘deep’ policing: ‘crash-for-cash’ insurance fraud investigation in England and Wales and the need for greater regulation
Authors:
Button, Mark; Brooks, Graham
Abstract:
The policing of insurance fraud has traditionally been dealt with beyond the criminal justice system as a private matter between the claimant and the insurer with only a few iconic cases referred to the criminal justice system each year. The growth of insurance fraud, particularly ‘crash-for-cash’ fraud, and the disinterest of the police, has led to a change in the response of the insurance industry. This paper will argue that this response can be characterised as a shift from the traditional ‘shallow’ to a ‘deeper’ form of policing which sees greater focus upon criminal and quasi-criminal outcomes. This paper explores some of the private and innovative methods the industry has developed and illustrates what greater private criminal investigation might look like at a time when police privatisation has become a higher profile issue. The paper argues the shift to ‘deeper’ policing necessitates greater regulation of the private investigation of crime and outlines a number of proposals to address this gap which require further consideration and debate.
Citation:
From ‘shallow’ to ‘deep’ policing: ‘crash-for-cash’ insurance fraud investigation in England and Wales and the need for greater regulation 2014, 26 (2):210 Policing and Society
Journal:
Policing and Society
Issue Date:
8-Oct-2014
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/604850
DOI:
10.1080/10439463.2014.942847
Additional Links:
http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/10439463.2014.942847
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
1043-9463; 1477-2728
Appears in Collections:
FOSS

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorButton, Marken
dc.contributor.authorBrooks, Grahamen
dc.date.accessioned2016-04-08T14:17:04Zen
dc.date.available2016-04-08T14:17:04Zen
dc.date.issued2014-10-08en
dc.identifier.citationFrom ‘shallow’ to ‘deep’ policing: ‘crash-for-cash’ insurance fraud investigation in England and Wales and the need for greater regulation 2014, 26 (2):210 Policing and Societyen
dc.identifier.issn1043-9463en
dc.identifier.issn1477-2728en
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/10439463.2014.942847en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/604850en
dc.description.abstractThe policing of insurance fraud has traditionally been dealt with beyond the criminal justice system as a private matter between the claimant and the insurer with only a few iconic cases referred to the criminal justice system each year. The growth of insurance fraud, particularly ‘crash-for-cash’ fraud, and the disinterest of the police, has led to a change in the response of the insurance industry. This paper will argue that this response can be characterised as a shift from the traditional ‘shallow’ to a ‘deeper’ form of policing which sees greater focus upon criminal and quasi-criminal outcomes. This paper explores some of the private and innovative methods the industry has developed and illustrates what greater private criminal investigation might look like at a time when police privatisation has become a higher profile issue. The paper argues the shift to ‘deeper’ policing necessitates greater regulation of the private investigation of crime and outlines a number of proposals to address this gap which require further consideration and debate.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/10439463.2014.942847en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Policing and Societyen
dc.subjectprivate investigationen
dc.subjectinsurance frauden
dc.subject‘shallow’ and ‘deep’ policing,en
dc.subjectprivatisationen
dc.subjectCriminologyen
dc.subjectPolicingen
dc.titleFrom ‘shallow’ to ‘deep’ policing: ‘crash-for-cash’ insurance fraud investigation in England and Wales and the need for greater regulationen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalPolicing and Societyen
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