Mind Usurps Program: Virtuality and the "New Machine Aesthetic" of Electronic Dance Music

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/604720
Title:
Mind Usurps Program: Virtuality and the "New Machine Aesthetic" of Electronic Dance Music
Authors:
Halligan, Benjamin
Abstract:
This chapter outlines the changes in perceptions of electronic dance music across the phase of the introduction of virtuality. The chapter argues that such music must be read in relation to its conception of its audience, and that the audience, often cognitively impaired, responds to the music in a way that suggests ideological positions that redeem the music from accusations of cliché and racism. The chapter notes early theorizing of virtuality as giving rise to the idea or potential of a proletarian collective, as was realized in aspects of rave cultures, as associated with the idea of the “temporary autonomous zone.” The chapter turns to specific case studies from the work of Layo and Bushwacka! and Leftfield.
Citation:
IN: Sheila Whiteley and Shara Rambarran (Eds), The Oxford Handbook of Music and Virtuality, in Part 4
Publisher:
Oxford University Press (US)
Issue Date:
Mar-2016
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/604720
Additional Links:
http://www.oxfordhandbooks.com/view/10.1093/oxfordhb/9780199321285.001.0001/oxfordhb-9780199321285
Type:
Book chapter
Language:
en
ISBN:
9780199321285
Appears in Collections:
FOA

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorHalligan, Benjaminen
dc.date.accessioned2016-04-07T09:35:49Zen
dc.date.available2016-04-07T09:35:49Zen
dc.date.issued2016-03en
dc.identifier.citationIN: Sheila Whiteley and Shara Rambarran (Eds), The Oxford Handbook of Music and Virtuality, in Part 4en
dc.identifier.isbn9780199321285en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/604720en
dc.description.abstractThis chapter outlines the changes in perceptions of electronic dance music across the phase of the introduction of virtuality. The chapter argues that such music must be read in relation to its conception of its audience, and that the audience, often cognitively impaired, responds to the music in a way that suggests ideological positions that redeem the music from accusations of cliché and racism. The chapter notes early theorizing of virtuality as giving rise to the idea or potential of a proletarian collective, as was realized in aspects of rave cultures, as associated with the idea of the “temporary autonomous zone.” The chapter turns to specific case studies from the work of Layo and Bushwacka! and Leftfield.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherOxford University Press (US)en
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.oxfordhandbooks.com/view/10.1093/oxfordhb/9780199321285.001.0001/oxfordhb-9780199321285en
dc.subjectMusicen
dc.subjectDJingen
dc.subjectDJ culturesen
dc.subjectsamplingen
dc.subjectCalifornian Ideologyen
dc.subjectmixingen
dc.subjectvirtualen
dc.subjectvirtualityen
dc.titleMind Usurps Program: Virtuality and the "New Machine Aesthetic" of Electronic Dance Musicen
dc.typeBook chapteren
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