Investigating the Postmortem Molecular Biology of Cartilage and its Potential Forensic Applications

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/604095
Title:
Investigating the Postmortem Molecular Biology of Cartilage and its Potential Forensic Applications
Authors:
Bolton, Shawna N.; Whitehead, Michael P.; Dudhia, Jayesh; Baldwin, Timothy C.; Sutton, Raul
Abstract:
This study investigated the postmortem molecular changes that articular cartilage undergoes following burial. Fresh pig trotters were interred in 30-cm-deep graves at two distinct locations exhibiting dissimilar soil environments for up to 42 days. Extracts of the metacarpophalangeal (MCP) and metatarsophalangeal (MTP) joint cartilage from trotters disinterred weekly over 6 weeks were analyzed by Western blot against the monoclonal antibody 2-B-6 to assess aggrecan degradation. In both soil conditions, aggrecan degradation by-products of decreasing molecular size and complexity were observed up to 21 days postmortem. Degradation products were undetected after this time and coincided with MCP/MTP joint exposure to the soil environment. These results show that cartilage proteoglycans undergo an ordered molecular breakdown, the analysis of which may have forensic applications. This model may prove useful for use as a human model and for forensic investigations concerning crimes against animals and the mortality of endangered species.
Citation:
Investigating the Postmortem Molecular Biology of Cartilage and its Potential Forensic Applications 2015, 60 (4):1061 Journal of Forensic Sciences
Publisher:
Wiley
Journal:
Journal of Forensic Sciences
Issue Date:
Jul-2015
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/604095
DOI:
10.1111/1556-4029.12764
Additional Links:
http://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/1556-4029.12764
Type:
Article
ISSN:
00221198
Appears in Collections:
FSE

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorBolton, Shawna N.en
dc.contributor.authorWhitehead, Michael P.en
dc.contributor.authorDudhia, Jayeshen
dc.contributor.authorBaldwin, Timothy C.en
dc.contributor.authorSutton, Raulen
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-31T14:46:28Zen
dc.date.available2016-03-31T14:46:28Zen
dc.date.issued2015-07en
dc.identifier.citationInvestigating the Postmortem Molecular Biology of Cartilage and its Potential Forensic Applications 2015, 60 (4):1061 Journal of Forensic Sciencesen
dc.identifier.issn00221198en
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/1556-4029.12764en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/604095en
dc.description.abstractThis study investigated the postmortem molecular changes that articular cartilage undergoes following burial. Fresh pig trotters were interred in 30-cm-deep graves at two distinct locations exhibiting dissimilar soil environments for up to 42 days. Extracts of the metacarpophalangeal (MCP) and metatarsophalangeal (MTP) joint cartilage from trotters disinterred weekly over 6 weeks were analyzed by Western blot against the monoclonal antibody 2-B-6 to assess aggrecan degradation. In both soil conditions, aggrecan degradation by-products of decreasing molecular size and complexity were observed up to 21 days postmortem. Degradation products were undetected after this time and coincided with MCP/MTP joint exposure to the soil environment. These results show that cartilage proteoglycans undergo an ordered molecular breakdown, the analysis of which may have forensic applications. This model may prove useful for use as a human model and for forensic investigations concerning crimes against animals and the mortality of endangered species.en
dc.publisherWileyen
dc.relation.urlhttp://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/1556-4029.12764en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Journal of Forensic Sciencesen
dc.subjectforensic scienceen
dc.subjectforensic taphonomyen
dc.subjectaggrecanen
dc.subjectcartilageen
dc.subjectglycosaminoglycansen
dc.subjectporcineen
dc.subjectpost-mortem intervalen
dc.subjectsoil environmenten
dc.titleInvestigating the Postmortem Molecular Biology of Cartilage and its Potential Forensic Applicationsen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Forensic Sciencesen
dc.contributor.institutionFaculty of Science and Engineering; University of Wolverhampton; Wulfruna Street Wolverhampton WV1 1LY U.Ken
dc.contributor.institutionFaculty of Science and Engineering; University of Wolverhampton; Wulfruna Street Wolverhampton WV1 1LY U.Ken
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Clinical Sciences and Services; The Royal Veterinary College; Hawkshead Lane North Mymms Hatfield Hertfordshire AL9 7TA U.Ken
dc.contributor.institutionFaculty of Science and Engineering; University of Wolverhampton; Wulfruna Street Wolverhampton WV1 1LY U.Ken
dc.contributor.institutionFaculty of Science and Engineering; University of Wolverhampton; Wulfruna Street Wolverhampton WV1 1LY U.Ken
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