Sexual selection and the evolution of altruism: males are more altruistic and cooperative towards attractive females

5.00
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/603601
Title:
Sexual selection and the evolution of altruism: males are more altruistic and cooperative towards attractive females
Authors:
Bhogal, Manpal Singh; Galbraith, Niall; Manktelow, Ken
Abstract:
Explaining altruism through an evolutionary lens has been a challenge for evolutionary theorists. Where altruism towards kin is well understood through kin selection, altruism towards non-kin is an evolutionary puzzle. Contemporary research has found that, through a game-theoretic framework, sexual selection could be an explanation for the evolution of altruism. Research suggests that males are more altruistic towards females they are interested in engaging with, sexually or romantically when distributing stakes in economic games. This study, adopting a between-groups design, tested the sexual selection explanation for altruism by asking participants to self-report altruistic and cooperative intention when reading moral scenarios accompanied by attractive or unattractive images. We find that participants, particularly males, report being more altruistic and cooperative when viewing an attractive image of a female. This study replicates the sexual selection hypothesis in explaining altruism through an alternative experimental framework to game theory.
Citation:
Sexual selection and the evolution of altruism: males are more altruistic and cooperative towards attractive females 2016, 7 (1) Letters on Evolutionary Behavioral Science
Publisher:
Human Behavior and Evolution Society of Japan,
Journal:
Letters on Evolutionary Behavioral Science
Issue Date:
7-Jan-2016
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/603601
DOI:
10.5178/lebs.2016.42
Additional Links:
http://lebs.hbesj.org/index.php/lebs/article/view/190
Type:
Article
ISSN:
1884-927X
Appears in Collections:
FEHW

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorBhogal, Manpal Singhen
dc.contributor.authorGalbraith, Niallen
dc.contributor.authorManktelow, Kenen
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-24T10:51:53Zen
dc.date.available2016-03-24T10:51:53Zen
dc.date.issued2016-01-07en
dc.identifier.citationSexual selection and the evolution of altruism: males are more altruistic and cooperative towards attractive females 2016, 7 (1) Letters on Evolutionary Behavioral Scienceen
dc.identifier.issn1884-927Xen
dc.identifier.doi10.5178/lebs.2016.42en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/603601en
dc.description.abstractExplaining altruism through an evolutionary lens has been a challenge for evolutionary theorists. Where altruism towards kin is well understood through kin selection, altruism towards non-kin is an evolutionary puzzle. Contemporary research has found that, through a game-theoretic framework, sexual selection could be an explanation for the evolution of altruism. Research suggests that males are more altruistic towards females they are interested in engaging with, sexually or romantically when distributing stakes in economic games. This study, adopting a between-groups design, tested the sexual selection explanation for altruism by asking participants to self-report altruistic and cooperative intention when reading moral scenarios accompanied by attractive or unattractive images. We find that participants, particularly males, report being more altruistic and cooperative when viewing an attractive image of a female. This study replicates the sexual selection hypothesis in explaining altruism through an alternative experimental framework to game theory.en
dc.publisherHuman Behavior and Evolution Society of Japan,en
dc.relation.urlhttp://lebs.hbesj.org/index.php/lebs/article/view/190en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Letters on Evolutionary Behavioral Scienceen
dc.subjectaltruismen
dc.subjectcooperationen
dc.subjectsexual selectionen
dc.subjectsexual intentionen
dc.titleSexual selection and the evolution of altruism: males are more altruistic and cooperative towards attractive femalesen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalLetters on Evolutionary Behavioral Scienceen
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