Sternal Gland Scent-Marking Signals Sex, Age, Rank, and Group Identity in Captive Mandrills.

2.00
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/601458
Title:
Sternal Gland Scent-Marking Signals Sex, Age, Rank, and Group Identity in Captive Mandrills.
Authors:
Vaglio, Stefano; Minicozzi, Pamela; Romoli, Riccardo; Boscaro, Francesca; Pieraccini, Giuseppe; Moneti, Gloriano; Moggi-Cecchi, Jacopo
Abstract:
Mandrills are one of the few Old World primates to show scent-marking. We combined ethological and chemical approaches to improve our understanding of this behavior in 3 zoo-managed groups. We observed the olfactory behavior performed by adults and adolescents (N = 39) for 775h. We investigated the volatile components of sternal scent-marks using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and compared volatile profiles with traits of the signaler. Males marked more than females and within each sex the frequency of scent-marking was related to age and dominance status, but alpha males scent-marked most frequently and particularly in specific areas at the enclosure boundaries. We identified a total of 77 volatile components of sternal gland secretion, including compounds functioning as male sex pheromones in other mammals, in scent-marks spontaneously released on filter paper by 27 male and 18 female mandrills. We confirmed our previous findings that chemical profiles contain information including sex, male age and rank, and we also found that odor may encode information about group membership in mandrills. Our results support the hypotheses that scent-marking signals the status of the dominant male as well as playing territorial functions but also suggest that it is part of sociosexual communication.
Citation:
Sternal Gland Scent-Marking Signals Sex, Age, Rank, and Group Identity in Captive Mandrills. 2016, 41 (2):177-86 Chem. Senses
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
Journal:
Chemical senses ISSN 0379-864X
Issue Date:
Feb-2016
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/601458
DOI:
10.1093/chemse/bjv077
PubMed ID:
26708734
Additional Links:
http://chemse.oxfordjournals.org/content/early/2015/12/25/chemse.bjv077.short?rss=1
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
1464-3553; 0379-864X
Appears in Collections:
FSE

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorVaglio, Stefanoen
dc.contributor.authorMinicozzi, Pamelaen
dc.contributor.authorRomoli, Riccardoen
dc.contributor.authorBoscaro, Francescaen
dc.contributor.authorPieraccini, Giuseppeen
dc.contributor.authorMoneti, Glorianoen
dc.contributor.authorMoggi-Cecchi, Jacopoen
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-16T15:11:49Zen
dc.date.available2016-03-16T15:11:49Zen
dc.date.issued2016-02en
dc.identifier.citationSternal Gland Scent-Marking Signals Sex, Age, Rank, and Group Identity in Captive Mandrills. 2016, 41 (2):177-86 Chem. Sensesen
dc.identifier.issn1464-3553en
dc.identifier.issn0379-864Xen
dc.identifier.pmid26708734en
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/chemse/bjv077en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/601458en
dc.description.abstractMandrills are one of the few Old World primates to show scent-marking. We combined ethological and chemical approaches to improve our understanding of this behavior in 3 zoo-managed groups. We observed the olfactory behavior performed by adults and adolescents (N = 39) for 775h. We investigated the volatile components of sternal scent-marks using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and compared volatile profiles with traits of the signaler. Males marked more than females and within each sex the frequency of scent-marking was related to age and dominance status, but alpha males scent-marked most frequently and particularly in specific areas at the enclosure boundaries. We identified a total of 77 volatile components of sternal gland secretion, including compounds functioning as male sex pheromones in other mammals, in scent-marks spontaneously released on filter paper by 27 male and 18 female mandrills. We confirmed our previous findings that chemical profiles contain information including sex, male age and rank, and we also found that odor may encode information about group membership in mandrills. Our results support the hypotheses that scent-marking signals the status of the dominant male as well as playing territorial functions but also suggest that it is part of sociosexual communication.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherOxford University Pressen
dc.relation.urlhttp://chemse.oxfordjournals.org/content/early/2015/12/25/chemse.bjv077.short?rss=1en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Chemical sensesen
dc.subjectDynamic Headspace Extractionen
dc.subjectGas Chromatographyen
dc.subjectMass Spectrometryen
dc.subjectMandrillus sphinxen
dc.subjectMandrillus sphinxen
dc.subjectPheromonesen
dc.subjectSignalingen
dc.titleSternal Gland Scent-Marking Signals Sex, Age, Rank, and Group Identity in Captive Mandrills.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalChemical senses ISSN 0379-864Xen

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