University of Wolverhampton
Browse
Collection All
bullet
bullet
bullet
bullet
Listed communities
bullet
bullet
bullet
bullet
bullet
bullet
bullet
bullet
bullet
bullet
bullet
bullet
bullet

Wolverhampton Intellectual Repository and E-Theses > Institute for Learning Enhancement (formerly CELT) > Institute for Learning Enhancement (ILE) > The effectiveness of innovative modes of delivery

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2436/5934
    Del.icio.us     LinkedIn     Citeulike     Connotea     Facebook     Stumble it!



Title: The effectiveness of innovative modes of delivery
Authors: Cartwright, Martin J.
Vallely, Christine
Citation: CELT Learning and Teaching Projects 2000/2001
Publisher: University of Wolverhampton
Issue Date: 2001
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/2436/5934
Additional Links: http://www.wlv.ac.uk/celt
Abstract: The School of Legal Studies has, since the mid 1990’s, been using a variety of different and innovative teaching and learning strategies in a number of areas in its portfolio. Of particular interest so far as this project was concerned is the range of modules in the undergraduate and postgraduate provision that have been supported by the use of CD ROMs, floppy disks and the internet. In line with the School’s long-term plan to turn over the LLB by Distance Learning degree to electronic delivery, and the shorter term aim to encourage the wider use of such delivery in campus-based modules, the authors wished to discover whether the innovations in teaching and learning mentioned above, especially in relation to electronic delivery, are being effective. The object of the research was to investigate the ways in which students learn and whether electronic delivery improves a student’s performance as compared to more traditional teaching and learning approaches. The authors also wished to ask questions about whether electronic delivery favours particular learning styles or whether students adapt their learning styles to the mode of delivery, and hoped to learn more about the extent to which students adopt ‘strategic’ approaches to their learning. It was also hoped to discover whether electronic delivery assists in developing ‘deep’ rather than ‘surface’ learning. The outcomes of this investigation will inform decisions about future innovations in the development of technologically supported teaching and learning materials. It will also inform decisions relating to the Teaching and Learning Strategy of the School.
Type: Book chapter
Language: en
Description: CELT Project on Changing Practice Through Innovation and Research
Keywords: University of Wolverhampton
Legal studies
E-learning
Distance learning
LLB
Law students
ISBN: 095421160X
Appears in Collections: Institute for Learning Enhancement (ILE)
Legal Studies Research Group
Legal Studies Research Group

Files in This Item:
File Description Size Format View/Open
In 3 Martin Cartwright (2 final).pdf176KbAdobe PDFThumbnail
View/Open

All Items in WIRE are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

 

Fairtrade - Guarantees a better deal for Third World Producers

University of Wolverhampton, Wulfruna Street, Wolverhampton, WV1 1LY

Course enquiries: 0800 953 3222, General enquiries: 01902 321000,
Email: enquiries@wlv.ac.uk | Freedom of Information | Disclaimer and copyright | Website feedback | The University as a charity

OR Logo Powered by Open Repository | Cookies