2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/5934
Title:
The effectiveness of innovative modes of delivery
Authors:
Cartwright, Martin J.; Vallely, Christine
Abstract:
The School of Legal Studies has, since the mid 1990’s, been using a variety of different and innovative teaching and learning strategies in a number of areas in its portfolio. Of particular interest so far as this project was concerned is the range of modules in the undergraduate and postgraduate provision that have been supported by the use of CD ROMs, floppy disks and the internet. In line with the School’s long-term plan to turn over the LLB by Distance Learning degree to electronic delivery, and the shorter term aim to encourage the wider use of such delivery in campus-based modules, the authors wished to discover whether the innovations in teaching and learning mentioned above, especially in relation to electronic delivery, are being effective. The object of the research was to investigate the ways in which students learn and whether electronic delivery improves a student’s performance as compared to more traditional teaching and learning approaches. The authors also wished to ask questions about whether electronic delivery favours particular learning styles or whether students adapt their learning styles to the mode of delivery, and hoped to learn more about the extent to which students adopt ‘strategic’ approaches to their learning. It was also hoped to discover whether electronic delivery assists in developing ‘deep’ rather than ‘surface’ learning. The outcomes of this investigation will inform decisions about future innovations in the development of technologically supported teaching and learning materials. It will also inform decisions relating to the Teaching and Learning Strategy of the School.
Citation:
CELT Learning and Teaching Projects 2000/2001
Publisher:
University of Wolverhampton
Issue Date:
2001
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/5934
Additional Links:
http://www.wlv.ac.uk/celt
Submitted date:
2006
Type:
Book chapter
Language:
en
Description:
CELT Project on Changing Practice Through Innovation and Research
ISBN:
095421160X
Appears in Collections:
Institute for Learning Enhancement (ILE); Legal Studies Research Group ; Legal Studies Research Group

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorCartwright, Martin J.-
dc.contributor.authorVallely, Christine-
dc.date.accessioned2006-11-07T13:04:47Z-
dc.date.available2006-11-07T13:04:47Z-
dc.date.issued2001-
dc.date.submitted2006-
dc.identifier.citationCELT Learning and Teaching Projects 2000/2001en
dc.identifier.isbn095421160X-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/5934-
dc.descriptionCELT Project on Changing Practice Through Innovation and Researchen
dc.description.abstractThe School of Legal Studies has, since the mid 1990’s, been using a variety of different and innovative teaching and learning strategies in a number of areas in its portfolio. Of particular interest so far as this project was concerned is the range of modules in the undergraduate and postgraduate provision that have been supported by the use of CD ROMs, floppy disks and the internet. In line with the School’s long-term plan to turn over the LLB by Distance Learning degree to electronic delivery, and the shorter term aim to encourage the wider use of such delivery in campus-based modules, the authors wished to discover whether the innovations in teaching and learning mentioned above, especially in relation to electronic delivery, are being effective. The object of the research was to investigate the ways in which students learn and whether electronic delivery improves a student’s performance as compared to more traditional teaching and learning approaches. The authors also wished to ask questions about whether electronic delivery favours particular learning styles or whether students adapt their learning styles to the mode of delivery, and hoped to learn more about the extent to which students adopt ‘strategic’ approaches to their learning. It was also hoped to discover whether electronic delivery assists in developing ‘deep’ rather than ‘surface’ learning. The outcomes of this investigation will inform decisions about future innovations in the development of technologically supported teaching and learning materials. It will also inform decisions relating to the Teaching and Learning Strategy of the School.en
dc.format.extent92672 bytes-
dc.format.extent180796 bytes-
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/msword-
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf-
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherUniversity of Wolverhamptonen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.wlv.ac.uk/celten
dc.subjectUniversity of Wolverhamptonen
dc.subjectLegal studiesen
dc.subjectE-learningen
dc.subjectDistance learningen
dc.subjectLLBen
dc.subjectLaw studentsen
dc.titleThe effectiveness of innovative modes of deliveryen
dc.typeBook chapteren
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