Exploring the Perception of African Caribbeans in Choosing a Career as a Counselling Psychologist: A Mixed Methods Approach

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/579935
Title:
Exploring the Perception of African Caribbeans in Choosing a Career as a Counselling Psychologist: A Mixed Methods Approach
Authors:
White, Ivet
Abstract:
This mixed method study explored the perceptions of African Caribbeans towards choosing careers as counselling psychologists. 131 (N = 131) African Caribbeans aged 16-55 contributed to this study. Firstly, an online and paper survey questionnaire was designed and administered to (N =121) participants. This comprised of (N = 41) parents; (N = 41) undergraduate psychology students and (N = 39) 16-18 year olds. An ANOVA Test indicated a significant effect between participatory groups. Semi structured interviews were carried out to explore these identified differences. 4 parents; 4 16-18 year olds; and 2 undergraduate psychology students were interviewed. Qualitative data was analysed using Braun & Clarke (2006) thematic analysis. Themes identified as significant across all groups were centred around participants’ perception of psychology; interest or otherwise in studying psychology and choosing it as a career option; knowledge about counselling psychology and choosing it as a career; the participants’ experiences of school; the attraction of particular careers such as sports and music for 16-18 year olds when compared to counselling psychology; the importance of support; attitudes towards mental health and the importance of having role models from the community that are counselling psychologists. Recommendations for the Division of Counselling Psychology, BPS, training and future research are outlined.
Issue Date:
Jul-2015
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/579935
Type:
Thesis
Language:
en
Description:
A thesis submitted...
Appears in Collections:
E-Theses

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorWhite, Iveten
dc.date.accessioned2015-10-20T13:44:26Zen
dc.date.available2015-10-20T13:44:26Zen
dc.date.issued2015-07en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/579935en
dc.descriptionA thesis submitted...en
dc.description.abstractThis mixed method study explored the perceptions of African Caribbeans towards choosing careers as counselling psychologists. 131 (N = 131) African Caribbeans aged 16-55 contributed to this study. Firstly, an online and paper survey questionnaire was designed and administered to (N =121) participants. This comprised of (N = 41) parents; (N = 41) undergraduate psychology students and (N = 39) 16-18 year olds. An ANOVA Test indicated a significant effect between participatory groups. Semi structured interviews were carried out to explore these identified differences. 4 parents; 4 16-18 year olds; and 2 undergraduate psychology students were interviewed. Qualitative data was analysed using Braun & Clarke (2006) thematic analysis. Themes identified as significant across all groups were centred around participants’ perception of psychology; interest or otherwise in studying psychology and choosing it as a career option; knowledge about counselling psychology and choosing it as a career; the participants’ experiences of school; the attraction of particular careers such as sports and music for 16-18 year olds when compared to counselling psychology; the importance of support; attitudes towards mental health and the importance of having role models from the community that are counselling psychologists. Recommendations for the Division of Counselling Psychology, BPS, training and future research are outlined.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectAfrican Caribbeanen
dc.subjectMental Healthen
dc.subjectCareer Choiceen
dc.subjectCounselling Psychologyen
dc.subjectPsychologyen
dc.subjectMixed Methodologyen
dc.subjectUnder-representationen
dc.subjectBlack and Minority Ethnicen
dc.titleExploring the Perception of African Caribbeans in Choosing a Career as a Counselling Psychologist: A Mixed Methods Approachen
dc.typeThesisen
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