Antisolvent crystallisation is a potential technique to prepare engineered lactose with promising aerosolisation properties: effect of saturation degree.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/576023
Title:
Antisolvent crystallisation is a potential technique to prepare engineered lactose with promising aerosolisation properties: effect of saturation degree.
Authors:
Kaialy, Waseem; Nokhodchi, Ali
Abstract:
Engineered lactose particles were prepared by anti-solvent crystallisation technique using lactose solutions with different saturation degrees. In comparison to commercial lactose, engineered lactose particles exhibited less elongated and more irregular shape (large aggregates composed of smaller sub-units), rougher surface texture, higher specific surface area, and different anomer form. Engineered lactose powders demonstrated smaller bulk density, smaller tap density, and higher porosity than commercial lactose powder. Dry powder inhaler (DPI) formulations containing engineered lactose and salbutamol sulphate as a model drug demonstrated improved drug content homogeneity and higher amounts of drug delivered to lower airway regions. Higher fine particle fraction of drug was obtained in the case of lactose powders with higher porosity, higher specific surface area and higher fine particle content (<5 μm). The results indicated that the higher the saturation degree of lactose solution used during crystallisation the smaller the specific surface area, the higher the amorphous lactose content, and the higher the β-lactose content of engineered lactose particles. Also, lactose powders obtained from lactose solution with higher degree of saturation showed higher bulk and tap densities and smaller porosity. Engineered lactose powders crystallized from lower saturation degree (20% and 30% w/v) deposited higher amounts of drug on lower airway regions. In conclusion, this study demonstrated that it is possible to prepare engineered lactose particles with favourable properties (e.g. higher fine particle fraction and better drug content homogeneity) for DPI formulations by using lactose solutions with lower degree of saturation during crystallisation process.
Citation:
Antisolvent crystallisation is a potential technique to prepare engineered lactose with promising aerosolisation properties: effect of saturation degree. 2012, 437 (1-2):57-69 Int J Pharm
Publisher:
Elsevier
Journal:
International journal of pharmaceutics
Issue Date:
1-Nov-2012
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/576023
DOI:
10.1016/j.ijpharm.2012.07.064
PubMed ID:
22884837
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
1873-3476
Appears in Collections:
Pharmacy and Natural Products Research Group

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorKaialy, Waseemen
dc.contributor.authorNokhodchi, Alien
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-27T14:51:59Zen
dc.date.available2015-08-27T14:51:59Zen
dc.date.issued2012-11-01en
dc.identifier.citationAntisolvent crystallisation is a potential technique to prepare engineered lactose with promising aerosolisation properties: effect of saturation degree. 2012, 437 (1-2):57-69 Int J Pharmen
dc.identifier.issn1873-3476en
dc.identifier.pmid22884837en
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.ijpharm.2012.07.064en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/576023en
dc.description.abstractEngineered lactose particles were prepared by anti-solvent crystallisation technique using lactose solutions with different saturation degrees. In comparison to commercial lactose, engineered lactose particles exhibited less elongated and more irregular shape (large aggregates composed of smaller sub-units), rougher surface texture, higher specific surface area, and different anomer form. Engineered lactose powders demonstrated smaller bulk density, smaller tap density, and higher porosity than commercial lactose powder. Dry powder inhaler (DPI) formulations containing engineered lactose and salbutamol sulphate as a model drug demonstrated improved drug content homogeneity and higher amounts of drug delivered to lower airway regions. Higher fine particle fraction of drug was obtained in the case of lactose powders with higher porosity, higher specific surface area and higher fine particle content (<5 μm). The results indicated that the higher the saturation degree of lactose solution used during crystallisation the smaller the specific surface area, the higher the amorphous lactose content, and the higher the β-lactose content of engineered lactose particles. Also, lactose powders obtained from lactose solution with higher degree of saturation showed higher bulk and tap densities and smaller porosity. Engineered lactose powders crystallized from lower saturation degree (20% and 30% w/v) deposited higher amounts of drug on lower airway regions. In conclusion, this study demonstrated that it is possible to prepare engineered lactose particles with favourable properties (e.g. higher fine particle fraction and better drug content homogeneity) for DPI formulations by using lactose solutions with lower degree of saturation during crystallisation process.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherElsevieren
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to International journal of pharmaceuticsen
dc.subjectDry powder inhaleren
dc.subjectSaturationen
dc.subjectEngineered lactoseen
dc.subjectDensityen
dc.subjectShapeen
dc.subjectRoughnessen
dc.subjectAnomer formen
dc.subjectPorosityen
dc.subjectHomogeneityen
dc.subjectFine particle fractionen
dc.subject.mesh1-Butanolen
dc.subject.meshAerosolsen
dc.subject.meshAlbuterolen
dc.subject.meshBronchodilator Agentsen
dc.subject.meshCrystallizationen
dc.subject.meshDrug Compoundingen
dc.subject.meshDry Powder Inhalersen
dc.subject.meshEthanolen
dc.subject.meshLactoseen
dc.subject.meshParticle Sizeen
dc.subject.meshSolventsen
dc.titleAntisolvent crystallisation is a potential technique to prepare engineered lactose with promising aerosolisation properties: effect of saturation degree.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalInternational journal of pharmaceuticsen

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