Influence of lactose carrier particle size on the aerosol performance of budesonide from a dry powder inhaler

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/575991
Title:
Influence of lactose carrier particle size on the aerosol performance of budesonide from a dry powder inhaler
Authors:
Kaialy, Waseem; Alhalaweh, Amjad; Velaga, Sitaram P.; Nokhodchi, Ali
Abstract:
The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of carrier particle size on properties of dry powder and its effect on dry powder inhaler (DPI) performance. Commercial α-lactose-monohydrate, a commonly used carrier in DPI formulations, was carefully sieved to obtain different lactose size fractions, namely Lac A (90–125 μm), Lac B (63–90 μm), Lac C (45–63 μm), Lac D (20–45 μm), and Lac E (< 20 μm). The lactose samples were analysed in terms of size, shape, solid state, density, and flowability. Lactose particles were blended with budesonide (< 5 μm) powder to generate five different formulations. These formulations were then evaluated in terms of budesonide–lactose adhesion properties, drug content homogeneity, and in vitro aerosolisation performance. The results demonstrated that lactose samples with smaller particle volume mean diameter have higher amorphous lactose content, higher true density (linear, r2 = 0.9932), higher surface smoothness (linear, r2 = 0.8752), smaller angularity (linear, r2 = 0.921), smaller bulk density, higher porosity (linear, r2 = 0.914), poorer flowability, and higher specific surface area. In general, the smaller the lactose particles the smaller are the budesonide–lactose adhesion properties. Budesonide formulated with smaller lactose particles exhibited smaller aerodynamic diameter and higher amounts of budesonide were delivered to lower stages of the impactor indicating improved DPI aerosolisation performance. However, the use of lactose particles with smaller volume mean diameter had a detrimental effect on budesonide content homogeneity and caused an increase in the amounts of budesonide deposited on oropharyngeal region. Therefore, particle size of the lactose within dry powder inhaler formulations should be selected carefully. Accordingly, higher drug aerosolisation efficiency of lactose particles with smaller size may have to be balanced due to considerations of other disadvantages including poorer flowability, reduced formulation stability, higher potential side effects, and higher dose variability.
Citation:
Influence of lactose carrier particle size on the aerosol performance of budesonide from a dry powder inhaler 2012, 227:74 Powder Technology
Publisher:
Elsevier
Journal:
Powder Technology
Issue Date:
Sep-2012
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/575991
DOI:
10.1016/j.powtec.2012.03.006
Additional Links:
http://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S003259101200160X
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
00325910
Appears in Collections:
Pharmacy and Natural Products Research Group

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorKaialy, Waseemen
dc.contributor.authorAlhalaweh, Amjaden
dc.contributor.authorVelaga, Sitaram P.en
dc.contributor.authorNokhodchi, Alien
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-27T14:50:39Zen
dc.date.available2015-08-27T14:50:39Zen
dc.date.issued2012-09en
dc.identifier.citationInfluence of lactose carrier particle size on the aerosol performance of budesonide from a dry powder inhaler 2012, 227:74 Powder Technologyen
dc.identifier.issn00325910en
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.powtec.2012.03.006en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/575991en
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of carrier particle size on properties of dry powder and its effect on dry powder inhaler (DPI) performance. Commercial α-lactose-monohydrate, a commonly used carrier in DPI formulations, was carefully sieved to obtain different lactose size fractions, namely Lac A (90–125 μm), Lac B (63–90 μm), Lac C (45–63 μm), Lac D (20–45 μm), and Lac E (< 20 μm). The lactose samples were analysed in terms of size, shape, solid state, density, and flowability. Lactose particles were blended with budesonide (< 5 μm) powder to generate five different formulations. These formulations were then evaluated in terms of budesonide–lactose adhesion properties, drug content homogeneity, and in vitro aerosolisation performance. The results demonstrated that lactose samples with smaller particle volume mean diameter have higher amorphous lactose content, higher true density (linear, r2 = 0.9932), higher surface smoothness (linear, r2 = 0.8752), smaller angularity (linear, r2 = 0.921), smaller bulk density, higher porosity (linear, r2 = 0.914), poorer flowability, and higher specific surface area. In general, the smaller the lactose particles the smaller are the budesonide–lactose adhesion properties. Budesonide formulated with smaller lactose particles exhibited smaller aerodynamic diameter and higher amounts of budesonide were delivered to lower stages of the impactor indicating improved DPI aerosolisation performance. However, the use of lactose particles with smaller volume mean diameter had a detrimental effect on budesonide content homogeneity and caused an increase in the amounts of budesonide deposited on oropharyngeal region. Therefore, particle size of the lactose within dry powder inhaler formulations should be selected carefully. Accordingly, higher drug aerosolisation efficiency of lactose particles with smaller size may have to be balanced due to considerations of other disadvantages including poorer flowability, reduced formulation stability, higher potential side effects, and higher dose variability.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherElsevieren
dc.relation.urlhttp://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S003259101200160Xen
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Powder Technologyen
dc.subjectCarrier sizeen
dc.subjectDensityen
dc.subjectFlowabilityen
dc.subjectRoughnessen
dc.subjectAdhesionen
dc.subjectHomogeneityen
dc.titleInfluence of lactose carrier particle size on the aerosol performance of budesonide from a dry powder inhaleren
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalPowder Technologyen
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