2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/565837
Title:
Law for engineering undergraduates on accredited courses
Authors:
Charlson, Jennifer
Abstract:
To achieve economies of scale, engineering departments in UK universities may choose to develop common modules. Law is a candidate for such shared delivery. However, professional institution accreditation for undergraduate degree programmes is important. Therefore engineering professional institutions' accreditation documentation was analysed and the relevant law requirements were extracted and summarised. The accreditation role of the Engineering Council and Joint Board of Moderators is explained. In addition, in recognition of the close relationship between civil engineering and construction the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors and Chartered Institute of Building's requirements were scrutinised. This paper then critiques the engineering and construction professional institutions' law requirements. Some overlap between the legal topics required by engineering and construction professional institutions is identified; for example, the legal framework, contract, environmental and health and safety law. They differ in that engineering bodies additionally require intellectual property awareness and construction institutions include dispute resolution and land law. It can be argued that both professional bodies should recognise the importance of European law. Who was consulted about the content and who could teach law to engineering and construction undergraduates is questioned. There is some commonality between the requirements of the engineering and construction professional institutions facilitating the delivery of shared law modules.
Citation:
Law for engineering undergraduates on accredited courses 2014, 167 (4):201 Proceedings of the ICE - Management, Procurement and Law
Publisher:
Thomas Telford
Journal:
Proceedings of the ICE - Management, Procurement and Law
Issue Date:
1-Aug-2014
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/565837
DOI:
10.1680/mpal.13.00030
Additional Links:
http://www.icevirtuallibrary.com/content/article/10.1680/mpal.13.00030
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
1751-4304; 1751-4312
Appears in Collections:
Construction and Infrastructure

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorCharlson, Jenniferen
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-11T11:31:09Zen
dc.date.available2015-08-11T11:31:09Zen
dc.date.issued2014-08-01en
dc.identifier.citationLaw for engineering undergraduates on accredited courses 2014, 167 (4):201 Proceedings of the ICE - Management, Procurement and Lawen
dc.identifier.issn1751-4304en
dc.identifier.issn1751-4312en
dc.identifier.doi10.1680/mpal.13.00030en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/565837en
dc.description.abstractTo achieve economies of scale, engineering departments in UK universities may choose to develop common modules. Law is a candidate for such shared delivery. However, professional institution accreditation for undergraduate degree programmes is important. Therefore engineering professional institutions' accreditation documentation was analysed and the relevant law requirements were extracted and summarised. The accreditation role of the Engineering Council and Joint Board of Moderators is explained. In addition, in recognition of the close relationship between civil engineering and construction the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors and Chartered Institute of Building's requirements were scrutinised. This paper then critiques the engineering and construction professional institutions' law requirements. Some overlap between the legal topics required by engineering and construction professional institutions is identified; for example, the legal framework, contract, environmental and health and safety law. They differ in that engineering bodies additionally require intellectual property awareness and construction institutions include dispute resolution and land law. It can be argued that both professional bodies should recognise the importance of European law. Who was consulted about the content and who could teach law to engineering and construction undergraduates is questioned. There is some commonality between the requirements of the engineering and construction professional institutions facilitating the delivery of shared law modules.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherThomas Telforden
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.icevirtuallibrary.com/content/article/10.1680/mpal.13.00030en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Proceedings of the ICE - Management, Procurement and Lawen
dc.subjectcodes of practice & standardsen
dc.subjectcontracts & lawen
dc.subjecteducation & trainingen
dc.titleLaw for engineering undergraduates on accredited coursesen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalProceedings of the ICE - Management, Procurement and Lawen
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