2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/565809
Title:
Stretch Intensity vs. Inflammation: A Dose-dependent Association?
Authors:
Apostolopoulos, Nikos; Metsios, George S.; Nevill, Alan M.; Koutedakis, Yiannis; Wyon, Matthew A.
Abstract:
The intensity of stretching is rarely reported in scientific literature. In this study, we examined the effects of stretching intensities at 30%, 60%, and 90% of maximum range of movement (mROM) on the inflammatory response of the right hamstring muscle. Methods: A randomised within-subject trial was conducted with 11 healthy recreationally active males over a three week period. Participants were strapped into an isokinetic dynamometer in the supine position, with the right knee fastened in a knee immobilizer. After randomising the ROM percentages, the hamstring muscle was moved to one of the three chosen ROM percentages for that week and held there for 5 x 60 seconds followed by a 10 second rest between repetitions. A 5ml blood sample was collected pre-, immediately post, and at 24 hours post intervention for high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) assessments. Results: Significant increases in hsCRP levels were observed between 30% mROM and 90% mROM (p=0.004) and 60% mROM and 90% mROM (p=0.034), but not between 30% and 60% (p>0.05). Conclusions: Muscle stretching at submaximal levels does not elicit a significant systemic inflammatory responses.
Citation:
Stretch Intensity vs. Inflammation: A Dose-dependent Association? 2015, 3 (1) International Journal of Kinesiology and Sports Science
Journal:
International Journal of Kinesiology and Sports Science
Issue Date:
31-Jan-2015
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/565809
DOI:
10.7575/aiac.ijkss.v.3n.1p.27
Additional Links:
http://www.journals.aiac.org.au/index.php/IJKSS/article/view/1623/1552
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
2202946X
Appears in Collections:
Sport, Exercise and Health Research Group

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorApostolopoulos, Nikosen
dc.contributor.authorMetsios, George S.en
dc.contributor.authorNevill, Alan M.en
dc.contributor.authorKoutedakis, Yiannisen
dc.contributor.authorWyon, Matthew A.en
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-11T09:15:40Zen
dc.date.available2015-08-11T09:15:40Zen
dc.date.issued2015-01-31en
dc.identifier.citationStretch Intensity vs. Inflammation: A Dose-dependent Association? 2015, 3 (1) International Journal of Kinesiology and Sports Scienceen
dc.identifier.issn2202946Xen
dc.identifier.doi10.7575/aiac.ijkss.v.3n.1p.27en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/565809en
dc.description.abstractThe intensity of stretching is rarely reported in scientific literature. In this study, we examined the effects of stretching intensities at 30%, 60%, and 90% of maximum range of movement (mROM) on the inflammatory response of the right hamstring muscle. Methods: A randomised within-subject trial was conducted with 11 healthy recreationally active males over a three week period. Participants were strapped into an isokinetic dynamometer in the supine position, with the right knee fastened in a knee immobilizer. After randomising the ROM percentages, the hamstring muscle was moved to one of the three chosen ROM percentages for that week and held there for 5 x 60 seconds followed by a 10 second rest between repetitions. A 5ml blood sample was collected pre-, immediately post, and at 24 hours post intervention for high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) assessments. Results: Significant increases in hsCRP levels were observed between 30% mROM and 90% mROM (p=0.004) and 60% mROM and 90% mROM (p=0.034), but not between 30% and 60% (p>0.05). Conclusions: Muscle stretching at submaximal levels does not elicit a significant systemic inflammatory responses.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.journals.aiac.org.au/index.php/IJKSS/article/view/1623/1552en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to International Journal of Kinesiology and Sports Scienceen
dc.subjectstretch intensityen
dc.subjectinflammationen
dc.subjecthsCRPen
dc.titleStretch Intensity vs. Inflammation: A Dose-dependent Association?en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalInternational Journal of Kinesiology and Sports Scienceen
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