2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/52133
Title:
Concentrated flow erosion rates reduced through biological geotextiles
Authors:
Smets, T.; Poesen, Jean; Langhans, C; Knapen, A; Fullen, Michael A.
Abstract:
Soil erosion by concentrated flow can cause serious environmental damage. Erosion-control geotextiles have considerable potential for reducing concentrated flow erosion. However, limited data are available on the erosion-reducing potential of geotextiles. In this study, the effectiveness of three biological geotextiles in reducing soil losses during concentrated flow is investigated. Hereto, runoff was simulated in a concentrated flow flume, filled with an erodible sandy loam on three slope gradients (13·5, 27·0 and 41·5%). Treatments included three biological geotextiles (borassus, buriti and bamboo) and one bare soil surface. Darcy–Weisbach friction coefficients ranged from 0·01 to 2·84. The highest values are observed for borassus covered soil surfaces, followed by buriti, bamboo and bare soil, respectively. The friction coefficients are linearly correlated with geotextile thickness. For the specific experimental conditions of this study, borassus geotextiles reduced soil detachment rate on average to 56%, buriti geotextiles to 59% and bamboo geotextiles to 66% of the soil detachment rate for bare soil surfaces. Total flow shear stress was the hydraulic parameter best predicting soil detachment rate for bare and geotextile covered surfaces (R² = 0·75–0·84, p < 0·001, n = 12–15). The highest resistance against soil detachment was observed for the borassus covered soil surfaces, followed by buriti, bamboo and bare soil surfaces, respectively. Overall, biological geotextiles are less effective in controlling concentrated flow erosion compared with interrill erosion. Copyright © 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
Citation:
Earth Surface Processes and Landforms, 34(4): 493-502
Publisher:
Wiley InterScience
Journal:
Earth Surface Processes and Landforms
Issue Date:
2009
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/52133
DOI:
10.1002/esp.1729
Additional Links:
http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/journal/121684678/abstract
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
01979337; 10969837
Appears in Collections:
Plant and Environmental Research Group

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorSmets, T.-
dc.contributor.authorPoesen, Jean-
dc.contributor.authorLanghans, C-
dc.contributor.authorKnapen, A-
dc.contributor.authorFullen, Michael A.-
dc.date.accessioned2009-03-04T18:13:33Z-
dc.date.available2009-03-04T18:13:33Z-
dc.date.issued2009-
dc.identifier.citationEarth Surface Processes and Landforms, 34(4): 493-502en
dc.identifier.issn01979337-
dc.identifier.issn10969837-
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/esp.1729-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/52133-
dc.description.abstractSoil erosion by concentrated flow can cause serious environmental damage. Erosion-control geotextiles have considerable potential for reducing concentrated flow erosion. However, limited data are available on the erosion-reducing potential of geotextiles. In this study, the effectiveness of three biological geotextiles in reducing soil losses during concentrated flow is investigated. Hereto, runoff was simulated in a concentrated flow flume, filled with an erodible sandy loam on three slope gradients (13·5, 27·0 and 41·5%). Treatments included three biological geotextiles (borassus, buriti and bamboo) and one bare soil surface. Darcy–Weisbach friction coefficients ranged from 0·01 to 2·84. The highest values are observed for borassus covered soil surfaces, followed by buriti, bamboo and bare soil, respectively. The friction coefficients are linearly correlated with geotextile thickness. For the specific experimental conditions of this study, borassus geotextiles reduced soil detachment rate on average to 56%, buriti geotextiles to 59% and bamboo geotextiles to 66% of the soil detachment rate for bare soil surfaces. Total flow shear stress was the hydraulic parameter best predicting soil detachment rate for bare and geotextile covered surfaces (R² = 0·75–0·84, p < 0·001, n = 12–15). The highest resistance against soil detachment was observed for the borassus covered soil surfaces, followed by buriti, bamboo and bare soil surfaces, respectively. Overall, biological geotextiles are less effective in controlling concentrated flow erosion compared with interrill erosion. Copyright © 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherWiley InterScienceen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www3.interscience.wiley.com/journal/121684678/abstracten
dc.subjectGeotextilesen
dc.subjectSurface roughnessen
dc.subjectFlow shear stressen
dc.subjectSurface coveren
dc.subjectSoil detachmenten
dc.subjectSoil erosionen
dc.subjectWater erosionen
dc.subjectSoil conservationen
dc.subjectRunoffen
dc.subjectBorassus aethiopumen
dc.subjectBuriti Palmen
dc.subjectBambooen
dc.subjectGeotextile matsen
dc.subjectPalm mat geotextilesen
dc.titleConcentrated flow erosion rates reduced through biological geotextilesen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalEarth Surface Processes and Landformsen
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